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For Senior Subject Course Selection information please click here

International Student Course Restrictions

International students should be advised that they are not eligible to participate in fully funded STAR or GATEWAY courses because these courses are only funded for New Zealand residents. Courses that are fully STAR funded include PAT and all GATEWAY courses. In addition Sports Academy, the First Aid component of Year 12 Health, and the Year 13 Philosophy university course are STAR funded and are therefore International students are not eligible to take these courses or components of these courses. Please check with the International Department first before submitting your course selection.

Courses and Credits

At Year 11, courses offer one Level 2 standard. In Year 12, between 14 and 18 credits in the course allow students to reach their Level 2 certificate. There is more flexibility at Level 3. In exceptional circumstances some students may be withdrawn from some credits in a course or have the opportunity to take extra credits. At Level 3, to help ensure students gain UE, extra credits may be offered.

Equipment Required

In all senior courses students will need to bring a device for learning, and books/ folders as required by individual subjects.

Course Title: Year 11 Business Studies (11BUS)

Whakataukī:

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō? Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; Ui mai koe ki ahau he aha te mea nui o te ao, Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing? Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; Ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?” I will reply, “It is people, people, people!”)

Subject Statement

Ākonga in Business Studies will learn the fundamental concepts viable businesses use to make decisions and improve business operations over time to become sustainable and successful.

Course Statement

They will carry out both individual and group activities. In this course students will take a product to market. From their initial ideas, through business planning, branding, promotion and sales they will reflect on strategies, financial and non-financial decision making and the key skills they develop along the way. This solidly prepares them for carry out Business in Year 12/13. Akōnga will also investigate whanau and business in the NZ economy and the interdependence of government, financial institutions and events that can have a direct and indirect impact.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate understanding that culture and values shape consumer perspectives and organisations’ putake
  • Demonstrate understanding of an organisation’s financial viability 
  • Demonstrate understanding of running a sustainable business activity 
  • Demonstrate understanding of the process that leads to an organisation’s financial decision
  • Demonstrate understanding how sectors and groups within society are interdependent

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
90843 Business Studies 2.1 Demonstrate understanding of the internal operations of a large business 4 External Written exam

Other Information

Costs: $50 for Workbook and Revision Book

Equipment Required: Calculator

Course Title: Year 11 Visual Art (11ART)

Whakataukī

Te toi whakairo, ka ihiihi, ka wehiwehi, ka aweawe te ao katoa.

(Artistic excellence makes the world sit up in wonder).

Subject Statement

Visual Arts is about building practical knowledge and skills through the experimentation of different media, processes and techniques. Whakapapa is explored through ahurea tuakiri and matauranga maori in a wider visual arts context.

Course Statement

In this course students will produce a series of related artworks that build upon personal, national and local histories. The study of customary and contemporary artists of Aotearoa – New Zealand and the world will inform student work. Students will be engaging and experimenting with critical and creative processes using a range of skills, media and techniques.

Learning Outcomes

  • Analyse how art is made, viewed and valued within a Visual Arts context
  • Select and demonstrate a range of art practices
  • Apply visual arts contexts and understanding of processes to make their own work
  • Interpret ideas and communicate ideas within a visual arts context
  • Investigate and evaluate learning that connects to local and authentic contexts
  • Analyse Visual Arts within Aotearoa as part of a wider context of Pacific artmaking
  • Demonstrate an understanding of connections between people, places and objects
  • Create a related series of artworks

Assessment:

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91325 2.5 Produce a resolved work that demonstrates control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions 4 Internal Finished artwork

Other Information:
Costs:
$55.
Equipment Required: All materials and resources supplied by the Department.

Course Title: Year 11 Classics (11CLA)

Whakataukī

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō?
Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; ui mai koe ki ahau he.
Aha te mea nui o te ao. Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing?
Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?”
I will reply, “It is people, people, people!”).

Subject Statement

Classical Studies is a multi-disciplinary study primarily of ancient Greece and Rome. Classics scholars consider the legacies of communities and individuals of antiquity, as preserved in works of art, literature, drama, and architecture. Ākonga studying Classics synthesize information from a variety of primary and secondary sources to make connections between ancient and modern societies.

Course Statement

In this course Ākonga will draw on their own experiences and cultures to understand that their lives and society are shaped by the same factors as those influencing people in the past, such as power, religion, ethics, and social structures. They will engage with artworks, architecture, and literature to develop an understanding of the values and social structures of the ancient world.

Ākonga will connect the pūrākau (story telling) of a work of art to enrich their understanding of the work’s context, intent, and impact. They will learn to make more informed selections regarding reliance and limitations of information and develop increasing understanding and confidence around using appropriate processes and strategies for engaging with primary and secondary sources.

Learning Outcomes

  • Make connections between the classical world and other cultures and societies.
  • Interpret, connect, and draw conclusions from primary and secondary source evidence.
  • Gain an appreciation for the literary, artistic and socio-political ideas of the classical world.
  • Use mythos, fonua and wairua to understand the ideas and values of the Classical World.
  • Relate classical concepts to mātauranga Māori, Pacific knowledges, and their personal experience.
  • Explore the impact on classical societies of key events, conflicts and/or figures.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91202 Classics 2.3
Demonstrate understanding of a significant event in the classical world
4 Internal Project / report

Other Information:
Costs:
None.
Equipment Required: None.

Course Title: Year 11 Dance (11DAN)

Whakataukī

Te toi whakairo, ka ihiihi, ka wehiwehi, ka aweawe te ao katoa.

(Artistic excellence makes the world sit up in wonder).

Subject Statement

Dance is about movement, creativity and collaboration. Dance is a movement language in which people can explore and communicate ideas, cultures and identities. Dance ākonga develop skills in movement, performance and choreography. They learn to understand and respond to a variety of dance styles and forms from a range of contexts. Through Dance, transferable skills such as collaboration, communication, teamwork, problem solving and creative thinking are nurtured.

Course Statement

In this course ākonga (students) will learn, to choreograph, perform and respond to dances. Students will learn a variety of dance styles to develop a range of movement and performance skills. Ākonga will gain a wide understanding of dance in Aotearoa. Students will study the development of a selected dance style. Students will develop their own duet and group choreography through an exploration of the dance elements (space, body, time, energy, relationships).

Students will learn skills to create and structure effective movement sequences that communicate ideas, images and feelings. Ākonga will collaborate and communicate with other learners in the process of learning, making and performing dance. Ākonga will have opportunities to connect with the wider dance community. Dance is a way to explore and express whakapapa. Ākonga gain a sense of community, identity and belonging.

Learning Outcomes

  • Perform a range of dance styles demonstrating key movement features.
  • Choreograph dance sequences through a process of exploring and applying the dance elements.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the key features of a selected dance style.
  • Explain the ways the dance elements (space, body, time, energy, relationships) are used to convey meaning or effect in their own work and the work of others.
  • Apply strategies for contributing to a group.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91208 Dance 2.4 Perform a theatre dance to communicate understanding of the dance 4 Internal Performance

Other Information:
Costs:
$30 for live performance visits.
Equipment Required: Track pants and a t-shirt.

Course Title: Year 11 Drama (11DRA)

Whakataukī

Te toi whakairo, ka ihiihi, ka wehiwehi, ka aweawe te ao katoa.

(Artistic excellence makes the world sit up in wonder).

Subject Statement

Drama is about understanding what it means to be human; who we are, where we’re from and where we stand. We stablish relationships through connection, collaboration and exploring creative processes. In performance, using drama techniques we develop a relationship with an audience through storytelling.

Course Statement

In this course students will, begin to understand how drama components and processes are used to create drama. Ākonga (Students) will explore the purposes and functions of drama in contemporary society.

They will gain access to Theatre Aotearoa and learn that drama is a way to explore and reflect upon whakapapa. Through this, Ākonga will gain understanding of creative processes by participating in drama and learn to express and explore their own and others’ ideas in the creative, collaborative process. Ultimately they will understand that the experience of live drama performance is reciprocal between the performance and the audience.

Learning Outcomes

  • Apply strategies to participate in collaborative, creative processes
  • Demonstrate how identity, culture, and perspectives are expressed through dramatic work
  • Use drama components and processes to express and communicate ideas
  • Identify purposes and functions of drama
  • Apply drama components and processes to create drama
  • Express their own and others’ ideas in the creative process
  • Demonstrate that the experience of live drama performance is reciprocal between the drama and the audience

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91213 Drama 2.1 Apply drama techniques in a scripted context 4 Internal Performance assessment

Other Information:
Costs:
$100 (to cover the cost of a range of theatre trips to enhance the students’ experience of theatre in its various forms).
Equipment Required: Comfortable clothing so you can move. Access to your Google Apps for Education.

Course Title: Year 11 Economics

Whakataukī

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō?
Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; ui mai koe ki ahau he.
Aha te mea nui o te ao. Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing?
Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?”
I will reply, “It is people, people, people!”).

Subject Statement

Economics is the study of decision-making through the use of economic concepts such as mātauranga, economic models and indicators. In Aotearoa New Zealand, economists draw from multiple worldviews to understand the economic world in different cultural contexts, using bodies of knowledge, including mātauranga Māori and Pacific knowledges, which have been developed over time.

Course Statement

In this course students will, develop their own ability to participate equitably in the economic system, evaluating economic information and decisions against the impacts they have on affected stakeholders and environments.

Ākonga will examine the interdependence of different sectors of the economy and how events impacting on one sector flow through to other sectors within the economy, society and the environment. Students will also be introduced to how global events affect Aotearoa on a macro level as they progress towards NCEA Level 2.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate understanding of how factors affect consumer demand
  • Demonstrate understanding of the interdependence between sectors of the economy, society and the environment
  • Demonstrate understanding of factors that influence firms supply
  • Investigate how decisions made by organisations impact themselves, society, and Aotearoa
  • Demonstrate understanding of how market forces affect markets and groups in society
  • Investigate the causes of trade and tauhokohoko
  • Investigate the impact of changes in trade and tauhokohoko on various groups in society

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
90843 Economics 2.1 Demonstrate understanding of the internal operations of a large business 4 External Written exam

Other Information:
Costs:
A workbook ($25), revision book ($20), subscription to the eLearn Economics website ($10), Field Trip expenses ($15 in 2017).
Equipment Required: 1B5 exercise book.

Course Title: Year 11 English (11ENG)

Whakataukī

Ko te reo te tuakiri.
Ko te reo tōku ahurei.
Ko te reo te ora.

(Language is my identity.
Language is my uniqueness.
Language is my life).

Subject Statement

English is the study, use and enjoyment of the English language for a range of purposes and audiences. By understanding how language works, students become more aware of the power that language has to enrich and shape their own and others’ lives.

Course Statement

In this course students will learn, how to better use and enjoy the English language and its literature for a range of purposes and audiences and in a variety of forms. They will further develop their sense of identity, their awareness of Aotearoa New Zealand’s unique heritage, and their understanding of the world. They will learn that language is rich and varied, adapts and changes, and is shaped by and for context. Students will learn to explain and justify their critical interpretations of texts, which will give them confidence in their personal voice. Interpreting and producing literary texts of increasing complexity will enable students to better understand what it means to be human, to empathise with others and become agents of change.

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe and explain language effects in a variety of contexts
  • Show understanding of the ideas and perspectives that shape a text
  • Develop ideas through the process of drafting, polishing and presenting
  • Follow a process to create accurate and controlled written texts for specific purposes and audiences
  • Recognise and respond to the rich perspectives of Māori voices in literature
  • Select texts for pleasure and personally respond to texts with appreciation
  • Explore identity through connections between text, self and our place in the Pacific
  • Assessment

    AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
    External
    Assessment
    Method
    91102

    OR

    91103

    English 2.5

    OR

    English 2.6

    Construct and deliver a crafted and controlled oral text

    OR

    Create a crafted and controlled visual and verbal text

    3 Internal Oral presentation

    OR

    Visual presentation

    >

    Other Information:
    Costs:
     None.

    Equipment Requireic.d: Exercise book, refill, ring binder/clear file, digital device for accessing Google Classroom.

Course Title: Year 11 Geography

Whakataukī

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō?
Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; ui mai koe ki ahau he.
Aha te mea nui o te ao. Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing?
Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?”
I will reply, “It is people, people, people!”).

Subject Statement

Geography is the study of the physical aspects of the world, and of the interaction between it and humans. It considers the question “What is where, why is it there and why do we care?” “Geography explains the past, illuminates the present and prepares us for the future. What could be more important than that?” – Michael Palin.

Course Statement

In this course students will, be equipped with the geographic knowledge and skills to enable them to better understand the interconnected world and develop a vision of the future. By using insight to draw connections between place and experience, students will begin to understand the role that people play in shaping the environment in which they live. Students will develop tools to think critically and be the architects of change that our planet needs.

This course draws on information from a range of disciplines. This allows in-depth analysis of relevant, local contemporary issues through to those of an increasingly globalised world. This course draws on information from multiple disciplines within a range of contexts. We consider our place in an increasingly globalised world and recognise the significance of local contemporary issues. Geographers learn through their feet and through field trips, students will apply and enhance their classroom learning.

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain how natural processes shape the environment.
  • Explore people’s positive and negative interactions with the environment.
  • Explore how power differences and perspectives influence decisions about the environment.
  • Explore how environments influence human behaviour.
  • Evaluate if the principles of kaitiakitanga are reflected in resource management.
  • Use geographic skills to collate and analyse evidence.
  • Communicate effectively in written and diagrammatic form.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91247 Geography 2.8 Apply spatial analysis, with guidance, to solve a geographic problem 3 Internal Project / report

Other Information:
Costs:
Compulsory day field trips in the local area, approximately $60. Optional overnight field trip to Waihi, approximately $160.
Equipment Required: Calculator, ruler, coloured pencils.

Course Title: Year 11 Health (11HEL)

Whakataukī:

He oranga ngākau, he pikinga waiora.

(Positive feelings in your heart will raise your sense of self-worth.)

Subject Statement

Students develop knowledge and skills that help them to promote positive well-being for themselves, other people, and society. They develop their understanding of hauora and how different aspects of well-being influence overall well-being. They will explore the inter-relationships between individuals, others and society that can influence well-being. They will also develop the skills to take action for their well-being, the well-being of others and/or their community.

Subject Statement

In this course students will take action to improve either their well-being, the well-being of others, or their community. They will develop and demonstrate a range of interpersonal skills, e.g. listening skills, assertive skills, decision-making skills. Student will investigate explore attributes and behaviours that contribute to healthy relationships. They will also develop knowledge and understanding of resiliency and how to develop protective factors for well-being.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate understanding of well-being and hauora 
  • Investigate the underpinning foundations of differing worldviews of well-being
  • Create and implement an action plan based on a well-being SMART goal
  • Evaluate effects on personal well-being, the well-being of others and/or community of action(s) taken
  • Demonstrate listening, assertive skills, and decision-making skills in a range of situations
  • Explore the attributes and behaviours that promote healthy relationships
  • Explore how protective and risk factors influence a person’s ability to manage change
  • Demonstrate how to plan and create nutritional and cost effective meals for adolescents

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91236 Health 2.2 Evaluate factors that influence people’s ability to manage change 5 Internal Essay – number of questions requiring paragraph answers

Other Information

Costs: None

Equipment Required: A4 Ring binder or clearfile.

Course Title: Year 11 History (11HIS)

Whakataukī

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō? Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; Ui mai koe ki ahau he aha te mea nui o te ao, Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing? Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; “What is the greatest thing in the world?” I will reply, I will reply “It is people, people, people!”)

Subject Statement

History seeks to understand how our present society has been formed in both Aotearoa and the world. Inquiry to historical sources and their perspectives promote thinking critically about how histories are both constructed and consented. The enables students to become global citizens and envision a future for Aotearoa grounded in Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Course Statement

In this course students will engage with historical contexts in both Aotearoa, the Pacific and the wider world with a focus on events of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Central to the study of history this year is the acknowledgement of the role played by oral histories in shaping and sustaining histories, as well as the importance of place to the histories of peoples. Students will learn about the ways that people have responded to power and the way this has led to social cohesion and/or conflict.

Students will develop research skills, the ability to construct an historical argument using evidence, and ability to explain a variety of perspectives.

Learning Outcomes

  • Engage with historical sources and recognise that histories are constructed and contested
  • Construct an argument that establishes the significance of historical events, places or people
  • Acknowledge the role oral histories play in understanding key historical events
  • Explain a variety of perspectives on historical events, places, and people
  • Explore responses to power and how this has led to social cohesion and/or conflict
  • Investigate histories and whakapapa of diverse communities in Aotearoa, the Pacific and beyond
  • Describe how significant places can be preserved and remembered

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91229 History 2.1 Carry out an inquiry of an historical event or place that is of significance to New Zealanders 4 Internal Research portfolio (digital)

Other Information:
Costs:
None.
Equipment Required:
None.

Course Title: Year 11 Chinese

Whakataukī

Ko tōu reo, ko tōku reo, te tuakiri tangata.
Tīhei uriuri, tīhei nakonako.

(Your voice and my voice are expressions of identity.
May our descendants live on and our hopes be fulfilled.)

Subject Statement

The ability to communicate in Chinese is a rewarding experience. It enables students to compare and contrast their own language(s) and thinking with those from the Chinese world, gaining a deeper insight into how languages convey ideas. Learning another language is an empowering process that requires risk-taking and fosters resilience, perseverance and cross-cultural understanding. Ultimately, it is a future-focused prerequisite for intercultural understanding and global citizenship as we realise our place in the Asia-Pacific region.

Course Statement

In this course students will engage with, and make meaning of, a variety of text types in Chinese. They will explore language commonly used to express information and compare and contrast ideas. In addition, they will acquire simple linguistic strategies and basic knowledge of how to use specific resources to make meaning from unfamiliar language. Furthermore, they will recognise key values and practices related to Chinese culture from a range of contexts.

Students will explore the use of Chinese script and the connection between script and pronunciation. They will recognise and develop and awareness of the importance of different registers of language to express respect and social status, as well as develop an understanding of how oral features such as pronunciation, tones and intonations can communicate different meanings. Learning Chinese in Year 11 will be all about immersing ourselves in the language and culture as we build our confidence by trying and being prepared to go beyond our usual comfort zone.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate understanding of information in spoken Chinese and provide relevant responses
  • Deliver a spoken presentation in Chinese to convey information, ideas, opinions and explanations
  • Facilitate and maintain a conversation in Chinese
  • Show understanding of information in written Chinese and provide relevant responses
  • Use Chinese script to convey information, ideas, opinions and reasons
  • Recognise and use different registers of Chinese to fit audience and purpose

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91109 Chinese 2.3 Interact using spoken Chinese to share information and justify ideas and opinions in different situations 5 Internal Spoken performance portfolio


Other Information:
Costs:
course fee $15.00.
Equipment required:
A4 size notebook or ring binder/folder, course workbook, personal device.
Prerequisites:
Students need to have done Year 10 Chinese for a full year or at the discretion of the subject teacher.

Course Title: Year 11 French

Whakataukī

Ko tōu reo, ko tōku reo, te tuakiri tangata.
Tīhei uriuri, tīhei nakonako.

(Your voice and my voice are expressions of identity.
May our descendants live on and our hopes be fulfilled.)

Subject Statement

French language learning is about developing the ability to communicate with others and acquiring the capacity to convey ideas. It is about discovering the rich history, customs, and cultures of the communities in which French is spoken, developing and fine-tuning linguistic skills in order to relate to, and interact appropriately with people in more than one cultural setting.

Course Statement

In this course students will be exposed to, practice and experiment with a wide range of spoken, written and visual French language. They will understand a variety of short and longer written text types, make meaning of short and longer spoken texts, speak and write expressing personal information, ideas and opinions in the past, present and future tenses in everyday and familiar contexts in French.

Students will use a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures to connect their ideas and opinions on different topics in everyday and familiar contexts. They will use resources to make meaning from unfamiliar language and linguistic strategies comparing and contrasting French-speaking cultures with their own cultures. Student grow to understand the process involved in French language acquisition, including sustained, repeated practice, risk-taking and learning from mistakes, exploring how language and culture affect and work together in communication.

Learning Outcomes

  • Interact and communicate orally in French
  • Show understanding of written French
  • Show understanding of spoken French
  • Use French to communicate in writing
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how language and culture contribute to identity

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91120 French 2.2 Give a spoken presentation in French that communicates information, ideas, and opinions 4 Internal Spoken presentation

Other Information:
Costs:
$20.
Equipment required: electronic device.
Prerequisites: Students need to have done a full Year 10 French programme or at the discretion of the subject teacher.

Course Title: Year 11 Mathematics and Statistics (11MAT)

Whakataukī

Kei hopu tōu ringa ki te aka tāepa, engari kia mau ki te aka matua.

(Cling to the main vine, not the loose one).

Subject Statement

Mathematics and statistics are about exploring and representing relationships in quantities, space, time and data. Mathematics is human endeavor – we must be responsive to the people and cultures involved. This subject allows sense-making of situations and is a tool to solve problems. In Mathematics, curiosity, creativity, persistence and positivity allow us to discover strong connections and increasingly useful models for real situations.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn to describe, generate and represent mathematical and statistical situations. They will move between dealing with very concrete situations to generalising and more abstract findings. Students will develop a curiosity to investigate a range of real-world situations and hypothetical situations (including ones personal to them and their locale). They will learn to express their thinking using a range of communication modes: verbal, written, visual and digital tools.

Students will connect and relate their mathematical and statistical work in culturally responsive ways. Students will work with a range of data displays and summaries and develop their ability to critique these and the claims that people make from them.

Learning Outcome

  • Explore and model problems involving mathematics
  • Source good data and know how to display and summarise it
  • Investigate situations involving measurements and 2D or 3D shapes
  • Communicate mathematically
  • Develop or critique arguments based on displayed data
  • Model situations involving data and chance
  • Leverage technology in mathematics and statistics

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91256 Geometry Apply co-ordinate geometry methods in solving problems 2 Internal

 

Other Information:
Costs:
$30 Revision/homework resource.
Equipment Required: Math’s exercise book (Grid), Ruler, Scientific Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx82) OR its worth considering a Graphics Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx9750).

Course Title: Level 1 Pangarau (Waiōrea)

Course Description:

  • This course will cater for a range of student abilities to allow all students to make real progress and achieve to their potential.
  • Differentiation will take place in lessons and will be considered in the decisions on which standards each student will sit.
  • This course leads to all Level 2 Mathematics/Statistics courses

Course Structure

  • Students will select some or all of the NCEA standards listed below.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91944 Explore data using a statistical enquiry process 5 Internal
AS91945 Use mathematical methods to explore problems that relate to life in Aotearoa New Zealand of the Pacific 5 Internal
AS91946 Interpret and apply mathematical and statistical information in context 5 External
AS91947 Demonstrate mathematical reasoning 5 External

 

Costs: $30 Revision/homework resource
Equipment Required: Maths exercise book (Grid), Ruler, Scientific Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx82) OR its worth considering a Graphics Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx9750)

Course Title: Year 11 Mathematics and Statistics

Whakataukī

Kei hopu tōu ringa ki te aka tāepa, engari kia mau ki te aka matua.

(Cling to the main vine, not the loose one).

Subject Statement

Mathematics and statistics are about exploring and representing relationships in quantities, space, time and data. Mathematics is human endeavor – we must be responsive to the people and cultures involved. This subject allows sense-making of situations and is a tool to solve problems. In Mathematics, curiosity, creativity, persistence and positivity allow us to discover strong connections and increasingly useful models for real situations.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn to describe, generate and represent mathematical and statistical situations. They will move between dealing with very concrete situations to generalising and more abstract findings. Students will develop a curiosity to investigate a range of real-world situations and hypothetical situations (including ones personal to them and their locale). They will learn to express their thinking using a range of communication modes: verbal, written, visual and digital tools.

Students will connect and relate their mathematical and statistical work in culturally responsive ways. Students will work with a range of data displays and summaries and develop their ability to critique these and the claims that people make from them.

Learning Outcome

  • Explore, describe and model problems involving mathematics.
  • Collect, explore, analyse and display data with appropriate statistical graphs and summaries.
  • Investigate situations involving measurements and 2D or 3D shapes.
  • Clearly communicate and justify generalisations formed about mathematical situations.
  • Develop or critique arguments based on displayed data.
  • Model situations involving data and chance, in order to make predictions.
  • Leverage technology for solving mathematical and statistical problems.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91256 Geometry Apply co-ordinate geometry methods in solving problems 2 Internal

 

Other Information:
Costs:
$30 Revision/homework resource.
Equipment Required: Math’s exercise book (Grid), Ruler, Scientific Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx82) OR its worth considering a Graphics Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx9750).

Course Title: Level 1 Pangarau (Waiōrea)

Course Description:

  • This course will cater for a range of student abilities to allow all students to make real progress and achieve to their potential.
  • Differentiation will take place in lessons and will be considered in the decisions on which standards each student will sit.
  • This course leads to all Level 2 Mathematics/Statistics courses

Course Structure

  • Students will select some or all of the NCEA standards listed below.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91944 Explore data using a statistical enquiry process 5 Internal
AS91945 Use mathematical methods to explore problems that relate to life in Aotearoa New Zealand of the Pacific 5 Internal
AS91946 Interpret and apply mathematical and statistical information in context 5 External
AS91947 Demonstrate mathematical reasoning 5 External

 

Costs: $30 Revision/homework resource
Equipment Required: Maths exercise book (Grid), Ruler, Scientific Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx82) OR its worth considering a Graphics Calculator (we recommend the Casio fx9750)

Course Title: Year 11 Media Studies

Whakataukī:

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō? Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; ui mai koe ki ahau he aha te mea nui o te ao. Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing? Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?” I will reply, “It is people, people, people.)

Subject Statement

Barbenheimer! Fortnight. Wes Anderson memes. Tiktok. The Media is a key part of so many aspects of our lives, and in Media Studies we not only investigate a range of media texts, but create these as well.   Through exploring, analysing and creating media texts, students can examine their own media use, think critically about the media they experience, and explore the impact the media has on the world around them.

Course Statement

Year 11 is the chance for students to focus on key media skills including developing production skills, exploring meaning in media texts, and thinking about themselves as media users and consumers. Students will explore the way in which media texts are created by looking at a range of media texts (film, tv, music, social media, games) and genres. Students will study different content creators to understand how they use media features to engage audiences. Students have the opportunity to work through all stages of media production including planning and designing, filming and editing, try a range of different media genres and mediums, and showcase their work to the school community. Throughout the year, they will also reflect on what it means to be a consumer of the media and the role they play in shaping the media world.

Learning Outcomes

  • Explore how media conventions create meaning in texts
  • Develop understanding of key elements of the production process
  • Work collaboratively to create media products and show reflection as part of the production process
  • Explore the way in which the media influences our understanding of the world
  • Explore our own use of the media and our role as media consumers and creators
  • Explore a range of genres and mediums

Assessment

 

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91250 Media 2.3 Demonstrate understanding of representation in the media 3 Internal Report / Essay / Presentation / Portfolio

Costs: $20
Equipment Required: Access to own device, with keyboard and refill for note taking. NOTE: Although it is NOT a requirement (as we have sufficient editing computers in the department), students can edit on their laptops, provided they have Adobe Premiere Pro installed. Parents/Caregivers must check that the laptop is capable of running this programme if a student intends to use their device to edit.

Course Title: Year 11 Music

Whakatauki:

Te toi whakairo, ka ihiihi, ka wehiwehi. ka aweawe te ao katoa

(Artistic excellence makes the world sit up in wonder)

Subject Statement:

Music is an expression of, and a way of connecting with, language, identity, and culture. Music enables people to experience and express feelings. Students will explore music from different contexts and express themselves creatively and emotionally through making original music and performing to an audience. 

Course Statement:

In this course students will explore the three main areas of Music – performance, composition and musicology.

Performance – Students will develop their performance skills on instruments and/or singing/rapping and will have a variety of performance opportunities.

Composition – Students will learn to create their own music in a variety of genres using instruments, vocals and/or music technology.

Musicology – Students will learn to analyse, describe and use the theory of music by studying a wide range of pieces from different genres, time periods and contexts.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Prepare, rehearse, interpret, and present performances
    of music
  • Analyse music from a range of genres and cultural contexts using the elements of music
  • Utilise music technology skills to replicate sounds and create music
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how te ao Māori concepts are experienced in Māori music contexts
  • Participate in creating original music to express imagination and emotions
  • Operate sound equipment for live performances and recordings

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91272 Making Music 2.3 Demonstrate ensemble skills by performing a substantial piece of music as a member of a group 4 Internal Performance

Costs: None
Equipment Required: None

Course Title: Year 11 Philosophy (11PHI)

Whakataukī

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te kōmako e kō?
Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai; ui mai koe ki ahau he.
Aha te mea nui o te ao. Māku e kī atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

(Remove the heart of the flax bush and where will the kōmako sing?
Proclaim it to the land, proclaim it to the sea; ask me, “What is the greatest thing in the world?”
I will reply, “It is people, people, people!”).

Subject Statement

Philosophy is about embracing different belief systems including indigenous knowledge from Aoteroa and the pacific. Students will also explore the historical and contemporary significance of religious and spiritual beliefs through a social inquiry lens and scientific observation. Exploration in these areas will help ākonga understand themselves, their whānau, and others around them.

Course Statement

This course will explore different ways in which religions and belief systems are identified and classified

Through discussion they will learn about the dynamic and complex relationships between cultures, identities and religions. This will help them to understand different belief systems, apply them to ethical scenarios and consider the wider influences globally and within Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Over the course students will be encouraged to explore philosophical and psychological ideas through a range of both indigenous and non-indigenous methodologies and perspectives. They will examine a range of research methods and seek to understand them through debate and argument. At the heart of this will be to investigate a range of real world contexts.

By building connections, students will begin to understand frameworks such as Te Tiriti o Waitangi-based ethical frameworks such as the Code of Ethics and Te Ara Tika in psychological and philosophical practice.

Throughout the course students will learn to explain how thought, action and behaviours shape relationships for themselves and others in society.

Learning Outcomes

  • Show understanding of Tūhonotanga: Connections between people, whenua and spirituality
  • Explore and respond to lessons from the past
  • Examine gender, cultural and religious biases.
  • Learn about the impact of Ethics and relationships to Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Aotearoa 
  • Explain how thought, action and behaviours are related to relationships to others
  • Explain how thought, action and behaviours are related to relationships to others

Assessment

 

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method

Other information: 
Costs:
None.
Equipment Required: a device, refill and a folder for keeping hand-outs and hard copies of documents.
To progress to Level 2 Philosophy 12 credits at this level, or at the discretion of the HOD.

Course Title: Year 11 Physical Education

Whakataukī

He oranga ngākau, he pikinga waiora.

(Positive feelings in your heart will raise your sense of self-worth).

Subject Statement

Physical Education is about movement and its importance in everyday life. Our subject facilitates a lifelong understanding of our bodies, contributes to our hauora and provides tools to live physically active lives. Physical Education provides opportunities to participate, relate and critically analyse self, others and society through a variety of contexts.

Course Statement

In this Year 11 course students will, develop and understand how movement impacts self, others and society. This will be demonstrated through a range of individual and team contexts both in and outside the classroom (EOTC). Throughout the year, students will focus on four big ideas. Through movement students develop diverse capabilities and acknowledge the importance of understanding and developing kotahitanga (unity/collaboration). They will show awareness and application of tikanga as well as reflecting on places and spaces of relation to te taiao (all conditions of the environment).

By participating in movement, students develop movement skills, learn to manage self and understand te ao Māori influences. There are diverse ways of understanding movement contexts and the moving body and students understand a range of biophysical principles and understand te ao Māori influences. Movement is essential to hauora and students make meaning on influences and understand and reflect on sociocultural factors.

Learning Outcomes

  • Consistently demonstrate kotahitanga in action
  • Apply and evaluate self management strategies in a movement context 
  • Analyse influences on physical activity and the effects on hauora
  • Explain how the body functions and allows for movement and physical activity 
  • Collaborate, plan and evaluate movement programmes to enrich lives
  • Demonstrate movement skills in a variety of contexts 
  • Reflect on how places and spaces influence movement with reference to te taiao 
  • Investigate how movement impacts self, others and society (whanaungatanga)

Assessment

Level 1 Physical Education/Hakinakina
Standards & credits being assessed in the course. All units consist of both Practical and Theory components.

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91335 Physical Education 2.9 91335 3 Internal Report or alternative presentation

Other Information:
Costs:
course costs = $80 period/half day trips, plus 1 camp = TBC.
Equipment Required: Physical Education uniform, an ICT device.

Course Title: Performing Arts Technology

Whakatauki:

Te toi whakairo, ka ihiihi, ka wehiwehi, ka aweawe te ao katoa

(Artistic Excellence makes the world sit up in wonder).

Subject statement:

Performing Arts Technology is about developing authentic outcomes that respond to production needs through Materials and Processing Technology practice. Auahatanga (innovation and creation) , manaakitanga (respect and care) and sustainability through kaitiakitanga informs an exploration through creative problem-solving projects, leading to fit-for-purpose outcomes for live arts and events contexts.

Course statement:

In this course, students will learn how to understand and apply a design process through the development of a series of technological outcomes. Through manipulating a selection of materials. techniques and processes students will build on their creative thinking and problem-solving skills. This will be supported through design based research and exploration as well as activities which develop their practical skills. Over the course students will grow their understanding of aesthetic, functional and manufacturing design considerations and will apply this knowledge in workshop and digital environments. Within this, they will be encouraged to explore different worldviews and knowledge bases, such as mātauranga Māori and develop confidence through perseverance, resilience and communication in the broadest sense over the duration of their design projects. In this course we look broadly at production roles. lighting design and operation, make up design and application, set and prop making and costume creation.

Learning Outcomes;

  • Demonstrate sustainable processes as a foundation of technological practice.
  • Implement a range of practical skills and auahatanga (innovation) to realise an authentic outcome that is fit for purpose.
  • Explore and consider different worldviews, cultural perspectives and knowledge bases to inform design ideas.
  • Contribute to a collaborative problem- solving exercise related to a live arts and events context.
  • Demonstrate an iterative design process and reflect on the effectiveness of an outcome.
  • Use a range of effective technological terminology and visual communication tools through the development of an outcome.

Assessment

 

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
US27701 Special effects make up design for an event Demonstrate and apply knowledge of make-up design for an entertainment and event context 4 Internal Practical

Other Information:

Costs: $100.00 (to cover the cost of a range of theatre trips to enhance the students’ experience of theatre in it’s various forms)

Equipment Required: comfortable clothing for movement and for making props, set pieces etc.

Course Title: Year 11 Science (11SCI)

Whakataukī

Mā te whakaaro nui e hanga te whare; mā te mātauranga e whakaū.

(Big ideas create the house; knowledge maintains it).

Subject Statement

Science is a human endeavor carried out to contribute to society’s understanding of the taiao (environment). Evidence is collected and tested to generate ideas and understanding. This knowledge is culturally based and constantly evolving. Society uses this evolving knowledge and skills to understand and develop solutions to problems.

Course Statement

In this course students will, develop understanding of big ideas in science through a variety of contexts which are relevant to their lives in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific. They will use critical thinking and analysis to explore different perspectives on science issues.

Ākonga will gather and interpret evidence from a range of sources and communicate using scientific language and conventions. They will also gain an understanding that science ideas are contestable and refined over time. Ākonga will appreciate that science is practised by every culture and that connections across cultural knowledges enrich our understanding.

Learning Outcomes

  • Form and refine science questions relevant to a context
  • Explain how scientific ideas are developed and refined over time
  • Carry out a range of investigations and draw conclusions from the evidence
  • Use appropriate language, representations and conventions to communicate scientific understanding
  • Demonstrate ability to critique scientific claims, explanations, or predictions
  • Develop evidence-based responses to socio-scientific issues
  • Recognise and evaluate more than one perspective related to socio-scientific issues

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91189 Earth & Space Science 2.3 Investigate geological processes in a New Zealand locality 4 Internal Poster

Other Information:
Costs:
Course Workbook: approximately $25.
Equipment Required: Calculator.

Course Title: Pūtaiao Kaupae 1 (Science NCEA Level 1)

Nga Ahuatanga – Course Description:

E toru ngā kaupapa nui o 11 Pūtaiao ara ko, Koiora, Matauranga Matu me Ahupungāo.

  • With a focus on learning Science through Te Reo, the Level 1 Science course is intended for students of the Rumaki who have the Te Reo skills to operate bilingually.
  • This course is designed to stimulate interest through the exploration of scientific ideas and their application and seeks to develop analytical and communication skills, as well as challenging creative and logical thinking.
  • The  content covered incorporates three scientific areas; Chemistry, Physics and Biology and is designed to provide a sound knowledge base for advancement to one or more of the Science subjects at Level 2.
  • Course Structure:
  • Students will complete some of the NCEA standards listed below.
  • Students will complete 15 credits.

Ngā Aromatawai – Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
AS91920 Science 1.1 Demonstrate understanding of a science- informed response to a local issue 5 Internal
AS91921 Science 1.2 Demonstrate understanding of the use of a range of scientific investigative approaches in a context 5 Internal
AS91922 Science 1.3 Describe features of science that have contributed to the development of a science idea in a local context 5 External
AS91923 Science 1.4 Demonstrate understanding of science- related claims in communicated information 5 External

 

Costs: Course Workbook: approx. $25.
Equipment Required: Calculator

Course Title: Year 11 Sports Academy (11SPO)

Whakatauki:

He oranga ngākau, he pikinga waiora.

(Positive feelings in your heart will raise your sense of self-worth).

Subject Statement:

Sports Academy is about challenging yourself and the love of physical activity through risk management. Our subject focuses on students working together to unpack and complete complex physical tasks. Sports Academy provides opportunities to participate in multiple physical settings which will challenge students in different ways.

Course Statement:

In this Year 11 course, students will develop and understand how risk management impacts self and others. This will be demonstrated through a range of individual and team contexts both inside and outside of the of the classroom (EOTC). Throughout the year students will focus on risk management. Students will develop diverse capabilities to understand and analyse risk. They will show awareness and application of tikanga as well as utilising the local curriculum. By participating in risk management settings, students develop understanding of risk, and the implications as well as how to manage risk through strategies and awareness.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop skills and knowledge in Te Taiao
  • Explore whakapapa, pūrākau and tikanga within Te Taiao
  • Analyse risk management strategies in an outdoor activity
  • Apply Kaitiakitanga, Whanaungatanga, Kotahitanga in Outdoor Education settings
  • Demonstrate the implications of risk management on self, others and society 
  • Demonstrate positive interpersonal skills in Outdoor Education settings
  • Demonstrate movement skills in a variety of contexts
  • Evaluate risk management strategies relevant to identified risk

Students complete a variety of activities: Action Matakana camp, rock climbing and a triathlon. Sports Performance and adventure racing are optional.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91333 Physical education 2.7 Analyse the application of risk management strategies to a challenging outdoor activity 3 Internal Report / essay

 

Costs: $ 400.00

Spaces are limited. The school reserves the right to make professional judgements to manage the size of the intake each year. If it is deemed by the school that a student would benefit from inclusion in the Sports Academy programme an application and interview process will occur.

Course Title: Year 11 Design and Visual Communication (11TVC)

Whakataukī

Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta.

(Do not lift the paddle out of unison; our canoe will never reach the shore).

Subject Statement

Design and visual communication is about developing products and spaces that respond to people’s needs by engaging authentically in the design process.

Course Statement

In Design and Visual Communication students will, learn to use design thinking to foster exploration, experimentation and problem solving. In writing briefs for their projects, students will seek new ways to improve the lives of people and their places, while being conscious and attentive to the way that design can impact the world around them.

In generating and developing their design ideas, students will express their own unique worldview and grow their understanding around function and aesthetics, while developing their ability to use ideation techniques such as sketching and rapid modelling. They will also explore both digital and analog techniques like modelling, hand rendering and computer modelling. In presenting their designs, students will develop their ability to visually communicate their ideas to an audience.

Learning Outcomes

  • Show manaakitanga by using design thinking to meets the needs of users 
  • Use design judgements to critique design practice and outcomes
  • Develop design ideas informed by whakapapa
  • Use visual communication skills and drawing conventions to communicate design thinking
  • Use visual communication techniques to promote a design outcome to an audience

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91343 Design and Visual Communication 2.36 Use visual communication techniques to compose a presentation of a design
4 Internal Portfolio


Other Information:
Costs:
Students will be asked to contribute $120 to cover consumable items and presentation folders. This includes an extensive Design and Visual Communication kit for each student to keep and all modelling materials.
Equipment Required:
Kit as stated above.

Course Title: Year 11 Digital Technology (11TDG)

Whakataukī

Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta

(Do not lift the paddle out of unison; our canoe will never reach the shore).

Subject Statement

Digital Technology is about applying established processes and principles within a digital environment, to solve problems and enhance possibilities by developing purposeful digital outcomes. These outcomes embody whanaungatanga (relationships, connections and belonging) and auahatanga (innovation and creativity), as they are made by people and for people to meet cultural, social and environmental expectations.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn to identify users needs and requirements by gathering  range of perspectives, clearly communicating and collaborating with others while demonstrating the importance of manaakitanga (respect and care) and ethical practices. Through critical investigation of existing and emerging technologies and their impacts, students will enhance their own ideas. They will become aware of their own strengths and wearknesses and develop the courage to try new techniques.

Students will learn to apply a range of computational thinking practises to design, develop and improve digital outcomes. They will manage their time and resources effectively while utilising feedback, testing and evaluation to see a project to conclusion. Finally, students will become informed user and innovative creators of technology.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate manaakitanga (respect and care) of users in the development of an outcome
  • Develop and refine ideas by practising auahatanga (innovation)
  • Apply appropriate design conventions
  • Apply common development practices
  • Demonstrate technical competencies using appropriate digital tools
  • Apply relevant computational thinking

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91891 Digitech 2.2 Apply conventions to develop a design for a digital technologies outcome 3 Internal Portfolio

Other Information:
Course content will not change and will fit within the new standards provided.
Equipment Required: All necessary equipment will be provided.
Costs: Students will be asked to contribute $70 to cover consumable items (electronic components, 3D printer materials).

Course Title: Year 11 Textiles Technology (11TTX)

Whakataukī

Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta.

(Do not lift the paddle out of unison; our canoe will never reach the shore).

Subject Statement

Textiles Technology is about developing authentic outcomes that respond to people’s needs through Materials and Processing Technology practice.
Auahatanga (innovation and creation), manaakitanga (respect and care) and sustainability through kaitiakitanga informs an exploration through creative problem-solving projects, leading to fit-for-purpose outcomes for personal, whānau or community-based needs.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn how to understand and apply a design process throughout the development of a series of technological outcomes. Through manipulating a selection of material, techniques and processes students will build on their creative thinking and problem-solving skills. This will be supported through design based research and exploration, as well as activities which develop their practical skills.

Over the course students will grow their understanding of aesthetic, functional and manufacturing design considerations and will apply this knowledge in workshop and digital environments. Within this, they will be encouraged to explore different worldviews and knowledge bases, such as mātauranga Māori and develop confidence through perseverance, resilience and communication in the broadest sense over the duration of their design projects.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate sustainable processes as a foundation of technological practice
  • Implement a range of skills and auahatanga (innovation) to create a fit for purpose outcome(s)
  • Explore and consider worldviews, cultural perspectives and knowledge bases to inform design ideas
  • Contribute to a collaborative problem solving exercise related to a local issue
  • Demonstrate an iterative design process and reflect on the effectiveness of an outcome
  • Learn and use specialist knowlege with confidence

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91356 Technology 2.3 Develop a conceptual design for an outcome 6 Internal Portfolio

Other Information:
Costs: $120 (fabric, notions, embellishments, tools etc.)
Equipment Required: All equipment and materials are supplied to the student.

Course Title: Year 11 Food Technology and Nutrition (11TFD)

Whakataukī

Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta.

(Do not lift the paddle out of unison; our canoe will never reach the shore).

Subject Statement

Through engaging with Food Technology and Nutrition, ākonga will learn about history, culture, traditions, tikanga and contemporary practices in relation to food. They will learn to appreciate this through auahatanga (innovation and creation), manaaki whenua (respect and care for the land) and sustainability through kaitiakitanga, leading to fit-for-purpose outcomes for personal, whānau or community-based needs.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn to understand how attitudes, values and beliefs influence our relationship with kai. Through manipulating a selection of ingredients, equipment, techniques and processes, students will build on their innovative thinking and problem-solving skills. This will be supported through student-led research and exploration, as well activities which develop their theoretical knowledge and practical skills.

Over the course, ākonga will grow their understanding of aesthetic, functional and manufacturing design considerations. Within this they will be encouraged to explore different worldviews through a holistic approach to kai and hauora. Exploring kai as an expression of manaakitanga provides an opportunity for ākonga to develop capabilities and attributes such as inclusivity, care, respect and concern for others while demonstrating tikanga around kai and whenua.

Learning Outcomes

  • Develop auahatanga (innovation) and apply practical skills to solve authentic problems
  • Examine the relationship between food, nutrition and culture
  • Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration skills that support working with others
  • Show an understanding of practices and strategies to address food handling issues
  • Reflect on and evaluate materials, techniques and processes to determine fit-for-purpose outcomes
  • Show an understanding of manaaki whenua, manaakitanga and economic factors in relation to kai
  • Master practical culinary skills

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91351 Processing Technologies 2.60 Implement advanced procedures to process a specified product 4 Internal Portfolio (slides)

Other Information:
Costs:
$120 for all ingredients and packaging supplied.
Equipment Required: Home Economics Textbooks-supplied.

Course Title: Year 11 Design Technology (11TDS)

Whakataukī

Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta.

(Do not lfie the paddle out of unison; our canoe will never reach the shore).

Subject Statement

Design Technology is about developing authentic outcomes that respond to people’s needs through Materials and Processing Technology practice. Auahatanga (innovation and creation), manaakitanga (respect and care) and sustainability through kaitiakitanga informs an exploration through creative problem-solving projects, leading to fit-for-purpose outcomes for personal, whānau or community-based needs.

Course Statement

In this course students will, learn how to understand and apply a design process throughout the development of a series of technological outcomes. Through manipulating a selection of materials, techniques and processes students will build on their creative thinking and problem-solving skills. This will be supported through design based research and exploration, as well as activities which develop their practical skills.

Over the course students will grow their understanding of aesthetic, functional and manufacturing design considerations and will apply this knowledge in workshop and digital environments. Within this, they will be encouraged to explore different worldviews and knowledge bases, such as mātauranga Māori and develop confidence through perseverance, resilience and communication is the broadest sense over the duration of their design projects.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate sustainable processes as a foundation of technological practice
  • Implement a range of skills and auahatanga (innovation) to create a fit for purpose outcome(s)
  • Explore and consider different worldviews, cultural perspectives and knowledge bases to inform design ideas
  • Contribute to a collaborative problem solving exercise related to a local issue
  • Demonstrate an iterative design process and reflect on the effectiveness of an outcome
  • Learn and use specialist knowlege with confidence

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method
91357 Technology 2.4 Undertake effective development to make and trial a prototype 6 Internal Portfolio

Other Information:
Costs:
 Students will be required to pay $120 to cover project materials. If students wish to make projects which exceed $120 in materials it is expected that they will meet these additional costs (wood, acrylic, electrical wire, paint, varnish, nuts and bolts).
Equipment Required: All necessary equipment will be provided.

Course Title: Level 1 Te Reo Māori

Course Description:

Emphasis is on the development of writing and speaking skills within traditional and contemporary contexts. Internal Assessments take place throughout the year. External Assessments will be practised in mid-year and preliminary examinations. Māori Performing Arts credits will be available to those that have participated in the school kapa haka competitions this year.

Course Structure

  • Students will complete all the NCEA standards listed below.
  • Students will complete 30 Credits.

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method

Costs: None
Equipment: None

Course Title: Level 1 Te Reo Rangatira

Course Description:

He kōwae ako tēnei, e whakahāngai ai ki te pūkenga o te paerewa 3 Te Reo Māori. He mea whakangungu te paerewa tahi Te Reo Rangatira [NCEA] e te ākonga e anga mai ana kia maoa ai tana mōhio mō te paerewa rua Te Reo Rangatira [NCEA]. E tika ana kei te arohia tōna anō mita e te ākonga kia tika mō te paerewa o te reanga 11TRR. Ko te whainga matua i ō te manako mō ngā ākonga kia noho rūmaki mārika tana mita a Iwi, nā wai rā ka puawai ai tana reo rangatira i te pō, i te ao. Ka amoria tonutia ngā kaupapa arotake i ngā pūkenga mō tēnei ahurewa akoako, arā, ko te tuhi, pānui, kōrero, mātakitaki me te whakarongo.  Ka 16 ngā whiwhinga o tēnei kōwae ako. Ka taea e te ākonga te taunaki kaiaka, te taunaki kairangi rānei i te whāia o wēnei aromatawai nei.

This course, although distinctively separate in its qualifications follows very closely to Year 11 Reo Rangatira, NCEA L1. It is strongly suggested that Year 9 and 10 Te Reo Rangatira has been completed to have a full understanding of theme content and level of fluency required for Reo Rangatira NCEA L1. It will adopt the same theme titles for module study. The current standards, are a selection of 4 internal standards plus 1 external standard to the total value of 16 credits will be offered. Students also sit 3 internal and 2 external Level 2 Te Reo Maori standards as part of this course worth 28 Level 2 credits in total.

Course Structure

  • Students will complete all the NCEA standards listed below.
  • Students can complete 16 credits in total (12 internal and 4 external)

Assessment

AS Number Subject # Full Standard Title Credits Internal /
External
Assessment
Method

Other Information

Costs: None

Equipment Required: Students are encouraged to have access to a Māori language dictionary at home (paper or digital)

Prerequisites: Year 9 and 10 Full Courses, NCEA Level 1 in Te Reo Māori Excellence, or at least 5-6 years progressive high fluency and background in Ngā Tikanga o Te Reo.

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