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Transition Times for Part-Year Courses

Year 9 Language and Technology Courses run for half a year, transition at the end of Term 2. Year 9 Arts Options run for around 10 weeks and transition at the end of each term.

The Course or Subject Name

+ The Timetable Provision for the Subject (E.g. Language Option, 1 Term, 3 Lessons a Week)

A Brief Overview of the Course

+ A Note on How the Subject Continues on throughout the school. (E.g. “At WSC Dance is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.)

Course Content/ Course Structure

(A brief outline of the main sections of the course.)

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

(With the Learning Dispositions (LDs) relating to conduct, effort and organisation, these Los will be used to generate the termly Learning Reports. Students will be given an Excellence, Merit, Achieved or Not Achieved for each of the LOs they have worked on during the term.)

Assessment

(The variety of assessment methods that are used in the course. Note, not all assessment will be linked to LOs.)

Equipment Required

(If students will need to bring any specialist equipment for the course.)

No Course Fees

(If there are any course fees they will be noted here.)

  • English (4 hours a week for the year)
  • Health Education (1 hour a week for the year)
  • Mathematics* (4 hours a week for the year)
  • Māori Studies (1 hour a week for the year)
  • Physical Education (2 hours a week for the year)
  • Social Studies (3 hours a week for the year)
  • Science (3 hours a week for the year)
  • Technology (3 hours a week for 2 terms)

* Some students move into Accelerated Mathematics during Year 9.

A) Students take one of the following over Year 9:

  • Chinese (3 hours a week for 2 terms)
  • French (3 hours a week for 2 terms)
  • Te Reo Māori (3 hours a week for 2 terms)

B) Students take four of the following over the Year 9:

  • Dance (3 hours a week for 1 term)
  • Drama (3 hours a week for 1 term)
  • Media (3 hours a week for 1 term)
  • Music (3 hours a week for 1 term)
  • Philosophy (3 hours a week for 1 term)
  • Visual Arts (3 hours a week for 1 term)

There is a Year WSC 2016 10 Compulsory Subject Course Book , and also a WSC 2016 Year 10 Option Subject Course Book .

Towards the end of Year 9 students and parents will be issued, electronically, with the 2017 versions of these Year 10 course books. At this point students will have to make option choices for Year 10. You will be notified of the exact process nearer the time.

Except for languages, there are NO prerequisites for any Year 10 Course (apart from the Sport’s Academy, where students must be playing for one of the school sports teams). With the exception of languages, students do NOT need to have taken the Year 9 course in a subject if they wish to take it in Year 10 or beyond.

During the year there will be an introductory programme of careers education for Year 9 students, which is based around a careers workbook, and is aimed at building a dialogue between home and school around careers planning. This will help students to think carefully about the options they take at the end of the year.

This course is a half-year course covers up to Level 3 of the new curriculum developing useful communication skills.

At WSC Chinese is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.


Course Content/ Course Structure

Chinese culture is introduced through the relevant learning areas, and students are expected to work on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Learning is extended through a range of learning activities: videos, songs and language websites. You will be using workbooks to facilitate your learning. Regular homework and revision including online work is essential. Short tests are run to monitor students’ learning progress

Learning areas:

  • About China, the culture and its people
  • Introducing self and others
  • Numbers
  • Talking about self
  • Talk about likes and dislikes

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

In both terms of the course from two to four of the following LOs will be reported on:

  • Recognise required Chinese characters.
  • Conduct a simple conversation in Chinese on personal information.
  • Give a short speech about myself in Chinese.
  • Listen and understand spoken Chinese about personal information, likes and dislikes.
  • Read and understand written Chinese bout personal information, likes and dislikes.
  • Research a specific Chinese culture and present it in the required setting

Assessment

Assessments include Chinese character recognition, speech, conversation, listening and reading, as well as research skills relating to culture


Equipment Required

Course required workbook
A4 size exercise book (for hand-outs and notes)
B4 size exercise book (for homework & short tests)


Course Fees

About $20


NOTE – If students wish to take Chinese in Year 10 and beyond they must take it in Year 9, or negotiate discretionary entry with the Head of Department.

(Arts Option, 1 Term, 3 Lessons a Week)

This course introduces students to a range of dance genres, performance skills, and the dance elements . Dance develops students’ creativity, physical confidence, teamwork skills, lateral thinking and resilience. Dance students learn to communicate verbally, non-verbally and in written form.

The course is mostly practical and gives students the option of performing in the Junior Arts Festival.

At WSC Dance is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.


Course Content/ Course Structure

  • Exploring a dance style – Hip Hop, Contemporary, Tango or Sasa
  • How to make a dance
  • Exploring the elements of dance
  • Skills for performance

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

  • Choreograph a pair or group sequence.
  • Apply strategies for contributing to group dance.

Assessment

Teacher assessment of a shared choreography presented to the class. Self/peer assessment and teacher assessment of contribution to group work.


Equipment Required

PE gear and 1B5 exercise book.


No Course Fees

Drama gives opportunities for creativity, collaboration and applying new skills to different performance genres. It develops communication skills, teamwork, builds self-confidence and spontaneity. Drama students learn to be adaptable, reliable and know how to have serious fun!

At WSC Drama is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.


Course Content/ Course Structure

  • Theatre Sports
  • Devised Theatre
  • Physical Theatre
  • Acting Techniques
  • Performance in the Junior Arts Festival

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

  • Use physical skills and drama conventions to devise and perform theatre.
  • Use acting techniques and drama conventions to perform a script.

Assessment

Devised Theatre: Devising Skills and Performance Skills – The Lost Thing.
Scripted Theatre: Acting Technique and Performance Skills – Creation Myth.


Equipment Required

Comfortable, supportive clothing.


No Course Fees

Our vision is to introduce and develop in our students the attitudes, skills and knowledge required to become confident, articulate and thoughtful members of New Zealand society. Success in English is fundamental to success across the curriculum, as all learning areas require students to receive, process and present ideas using English as a medium. By understanding how language works, young people can learn to make appropriate language choices and apply them in a range of contexts. Through studying and enjoying a diverse range of texts, students can develop a stronger sense of their own identity in the world, and an appreciation of their rich multicultural heritage. Note that the Year 9 course is part of a two-year programme at WSC arranged to cover the English Curriculum in depth.

At WSC English is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.


Course Content/ Course Structure

Our course is designed to develop students’ skills in the following areas:

  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Viewing
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Presenting

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Each term, English teachers will choose a unifying theme or topic on which to base their programme and will teach and assess two of the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop creative writing skills
  • Respond to written text(s)
  • Respond to visual text(s)
  • Close reading of written text(s)
  • Write and deliver a speech
  • Present ideas in a visual form
  • Develop wide reading*

(*Each term students will complete a reading response on a written text or film – with a final assessment in Term 4.)


Assessment

Students are assessed through class tests, oral presentations, visual presentations, essays, group tasks and assignments.


Equipment Required

1b5 exercise book, pens & pencils.


No Course Fees

This course covers up to Level 3 of the new curriculum developing useful communication skills.

At WSC French is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.


Course Content/ Course Structure

Different topics are studied leading to the acquisition of languages learning skills: learning vocabulary, listening, reading, and writing skills. An understanding of the French culture is developed in class with discussions, and vocabulary is extended with a range of learning activities (videos, songs, games and language websites). Regular revision of class work is necessary.

Topics:

  • Introducing myself
  • Classroom and stationary
  • Hobbies
  • Likes and dislikes
  • Colours
  • Animals
  • Family
  • Where I live
  • Snacks
  • Countries and nationalities

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

  • Write and deliver a speech introducing myself.
  • Express likes and dislikes.

Term 2

  • Demonstrate understanding of a short spoken text in the context of personal information
  • Demonstrate understanding of a short written text in the context of personal information
  • Write a short text, with resources, about myself and my family .

Assessment

Assessments focus on four language skills – speaking, listening, reading and writing. A speech in the first term assesses the speaking skill, a written end of course test assesses the listening, reading and writing skills.


Equipment Required

Course required workbook (Access Studio)
A4 size exercise book


Course Fee

About $25


NOTE – If students wish to take French in Year 10 and beyond they must take it in Year 9, or negotiate discretionary entry with the Teacher in Charge and the Head of Department.

The aim of this course is to introduce students to two of the underlying concepts of health – hauora and the health curriculum ‘attitudes and values’. Students will reflect on the nature of well-being, develop their understanding of factors that influence health, and develop self-management skills that promote resilience.

At WSC Health is offered up to Level 3 NCEA.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Friendship – qualities of friendships, influences on personal identity
● Put Downs, Bully Anger – define put downs, bullying (including cyber bullying), and anger. Develop strategies for prevention, managing and seeking help.
● Interpersonal Skills – listening, assertiveness and decision-making skills.
● Smoking – investigate effects on self and others, and influences on smoking choices and behaviours.
● Alcohol – examine the implications for well-being and influences on drinking behaviours, standard drinks, host responsibility, strategies for responsible drinking behaviours, and alcohol support agencies.
● Sexuality – pubertal changes, relationships (managing changes and responsibilities within relationships), contraception, STI’s.
● Drugs – marijuana and the implications for well-being.
● Safety – examine social messages and stereotypes, discrimination and sexual harassment.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Note: Staff will select 3 Learning Outcomes for each term.

Term 1

● Demonstrate understanding of the ways personal identity can be defined.
● Describe personal and societal influences that can contribute to personal well-being.
● Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect by drawing on personal knowledge and experiences.
● Demonstrate the ability to plan and work effectively to meet deadlines.
● Demonstrate appropriate interactions with other people in group and class situations.

Term 2

● Demonstrate a range of assertive skills in practical situations.
● Demonstrate the skills to accurately apply the DESC model as an assertive response.
● Describe the skills and processes for being assertive.
● Investigate and describes lifestyle factors and media influences contributing to smoking in NZ.
● Actively listen and shares ideas in discussions and group activities.

Term 3

● Access information on the effects of alcohol on the body.
● Use this information to determine possible short and long-term risks associated with alcohol.
● Demonstrate understanding of the effects of alcohol on self and others.
● Identify alcohol helping agencies.
● Demonstrate a range of skills that enable them to interact appropriately in group situations.

Term 4

● Uses information to make safe choices in a range of contexts.
● Demonstrates understanding of possible impacts of health issues on an individual’s well-being.
● Demonstrates ability to make health enhancing decisions for themselves and others.
● Demonstrates a range of communication skills enabling them to interact appropriately with others.

Assessment

Throughout the year we use a range of assessment methods. Formative assessment is on-going throughout the year; it includes participation in class and group discussions and activities. There are 3 summative assessments during the year:

Friendship – reflect on influences on person identity and self-worth.
Assertiveness – provide assertive responses in a range of situations.
Alcohol – effects on hauora of self and others.

Equipment Required

WA4 Exercise book

No Course Fees

The course consists of 3 strands; Number and Algebra, Geometry and Measurement, and Statistics and Probability based on the New Zealand Mathematics Curriculum.

The aim of this course is to extend students Mathematical knowledge while at the same time developing their creative, critical, strategic and logical thinking skills.

Students will also be introduced to the NCEA style of assessment and marking in preparation for secondary school mathematics.

At WSC Calculus, Statistics and General Mathematics are offered up to Level 3 NCEA, and both Calculus and Statistics at Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

The 3 strands are divided into 7 units for teaching and assessment purposes.

Term 1

Statistics : PPDAC cycle, types of data, constructing and reading graphs, measures of central tendency and spread.
Number : number properties and operations, BEDMAS, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and problem solving.

Term 2

Algebraic Manipulation : simplify algebraic expressions, expanding and factorising, solving equations and substitution into formulae.
Sequences and Graphs : patterns, algebraic formulae of a sequence, plotting graphs, gradient of a line, y-intercept, and equation of a line.

Term 3

Measurement : units of measure, practical measuring, perimeter, area and volume.
Revision : how to revise for Mathematics external exams, use of past papers, finding resources and identifying areas in need of work.

Term 4

Geometry : angle construction, bearings and direction, angle theory and geometric reasoning.
Transformations : symmetry, reflection, totation, translation and enlargement.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

● Investigate data using the statistical inquiry cycle.
● Show understanding of multiple number systems and methods (e.g. fractions, decimals, percentages and negative numbers).

Term 2

● Develop a range of algebraic skills.
● Show an understanding of patterns and graphs and the links between them.

Term 3

● Plan and produce a mathematical model to solve a measurement problem.
● Act on feedback and use revision to progress their learning and achievement.

Term 4

● Develop independent study skills through completion of homework and revision. ● Apply geometric reasoning when solving problems.

Assessment

This course is assessed using a mixture of end of topic tests, investigational projects, exams in Term 3 and 4 and ongoing teacher in class assessment.

Equipment Required

Calculator (A Scientific calculator is not necessary but students may wish to start familiarising themselves with this type of calculator, a phone is not sufficient as these may not be used in assessments). Ruler and Protractor. Internet access at home or through homework centres at school.

Course Fees

$30.00 – Covers registration for Maths buddy, the online homework system that we subscribe to, and other resources.

The course consists of 3 strands; Number and Algebra, Geometry and Measure, and Statistics and Probability based on the New Zealand Mathematics Curriculum.

The aim of this course is to extend students Mathematical knowledge while at the same time developing their creative, critical, strategic and logical thinking skills.

Students will also be introduced to the NCEA style of assessment and marking in preparation for secondary school mathematics.

This course is designed for students who need a higher level of challenge as it covers the Year 9 scheme and extends students into the year 10 scheme. Completion of this course prepares students for Year 10 Advanced or Accelerated Mathematics and Statistics.

At WSC Calculus, Statistics and General Mathematics is offered up to Level 3 NCEA, and both Calculus and Statistics at Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

The 3 strands are divided into 7 units for teaching and assessment purposes.

Term 1

Statistics : PPDAC cycle, types of data, constructing and reading graphs, measures of central tendency and spread.
Number : number properties and operations, BEDMAS, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and problem solving.

Term 2

Algebraic Manipulation : simplify algebraic expressions, expanding and factorising, solving equations and substitution into formulae.
Sequences and Graphs ; algebraic formulae of a sequence, plotting graphs, gradient of a line, y-intercept, and equation of a line.

Term 3

Geometry and Measures : angle construction, angle theory and geometric reasoning, Pythagoras and trigonometry.
Revision : how to revise for Mathematics external exams, use of past papers, finding resources and identifying areas in need of work.

Term 4

Probability : working with probabilities, estimating outcomes, using the PPDAC cycle to investigate probability.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

● Investigate data using the statistical inquiry cycle.
● Show understanding of multiple number systems and methods (e.g. fractions, decimals, percentages and negative numbers).

Term 2

● Develop a range of algebraic skills.
● Show an understanding of patterns and graphs and the links between them.

Term 3

● Plan and produce a mathematical model to solve a measurement problem.
● Act on feedback and use revision to progress their learning and achievement.

Term 4:

● Investigate and apply various methods in situations involving probability .
● Develop independent study skills through completion of homework and revision.

Assessment

This course is assessed using a mixture of end of topic tests, investigational projects, exams in Terms 3 and 4 and ongoing teacher in class assessment. Equipment Required Calculator (A Scientific calculator is not necessary but students may wish to start familiarising themselves with this type of calculator). Ruler and Protractor. Internet access at home or through homework centres at school.

Course Fees $30.00 – Covers registration for Maths buddy, the online homework system, that we subscribe to and other resources.

This course of te reo Māori and tikanga Māori aims to provide the student with the necessary tools to converse in te reo Māori while also giving understanding to many tikanga concepts of the Māori world.

At WSC te reo Māori is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content / Course Structure

By the end of this course, students will understand te reo Māori that contains well-rehearsed sentence patterns and familiar vocabulary and can interact in predictable exchanges. They will read and write straightforward versions of what they have learned to say. They will explain the meaning behind marae protocols and various tikanga concepts and beliefs. They will be aware of and understand some of the typical cultural conventions that operate in interpersonal communication. Students will also develop an awareness of the processes involved in learning te reo Māori.

All the modes of language learning are covered throughout the year:
● tuhituhi / writing
● kōrero / speaking,
● whakarongo / listening,
● pānui / reading,
● whakaatu / presenting,
● mātakitaki / viewing.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

● Greet, farewell, and acknowledge people and respond to greetings and acknowledgments.
● Introduce themselves and others and respond to introductions.
● Communicate about personal information, such as name, parents’ and grandparents’ names, iwi, hapū, mountain and river, or home town and place of family origin.
● Explain the meanings behind different protocols on a marae and common practices.

Term 2

● Communicate about numbers, using days of the week, months and dates.
● Understand and use simple polite conventions, for example, ways of acknowledging people, expressing regret and complimenting people.
● Explain the contexts and meanings of the following concepts: manaakitanga, aroha, wairua, mana, whanaungatanga, hauora, tapu, noa, whenua.

Term 3

● Communicate about location.
● Use and respond to simple classroom language (including asking for the word to express something in te reo Māori).
● Name historical landmarks in Tāmaki Makaurau and demonstrate understanding of historical Ngāti Whatua events.

Term 4

● Communicate about like and dislikes, giving reasons where appropriate.
● Communicate about physical characteristics, personality and feelings.
● Demonstrate an understanding of the signing, the articles and current issues of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Assessment

Major tests include speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, and regular vocabulary tests. This will require regular homework and grammar and vocabulary revision, as well as online learning.

No Equipment Required

No Course Fee

Year 9 Media Studies is an introduction to Media Studies. It is a term long course and offers a ‘taster’ of media concepts and practical work.

At WSC Media Studies is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Define what the media ‘is’ – and why we should understand the role of the media in our lives
● Learn the language of film by close reading a film and producing our own film
● Learn to use the camera and editing software (Adobe Premiere Pro)

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

● Demonstrate understanding of how media conventions/techniques are used in media text/s.
● Produce Media Text Using Media Conventions.
● Demonstrate an ability to work with others on a media product ion.

Assessment

Students will create a short video item showing: their understanding of med techniques/conventions their ability to work in a group to complete a media productions. Time allowing, student may also complete a close reading assessment on a film they have studied.

Equipment Required

None

No Course Fees

Music in Year 9 is a one-term course designed to get students involved in music making. The course introduces newcomers to music concepts and performance skills, while students who are already accomplished musicians are challenged to extend their skills via composition.

At WSC Music is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

  • The language of music – how to make sense of the squiggles.
  • Playing guitar, piano and drums, and other instruments depending on skills in the class.
  • Group composition.
  • The building blocks of music – understanding what we are listening to.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

  • Actively engage in the composition and performance of pieces of music using piano, guitar and drums.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic music notation.

Assessment

Via performance, group composition, written and aural tests.

Equipment Required

None

No Course Fees

This is a general introduction to Philosophy. The idea is to find out about some of the thinkers, ideas, topics and activities that Philosophy is based on, and to answer some intriguing questions.

At WSC Philosophy is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and university level.

Course Content/ Course Structure

We look at several different areas and themes over the duration of the course, although the ideas we discuss in one area often start cropping up again in unexpected places. The list below gives an idea of what we will be doing.

Each week’s theme makes connections between Philosophy and everyday life.

Knowledge and Reasoning

What is an argument?
What different arguments do philosophers use?
What are “truth”, “proof” and “belief”?
Does knowledge require certainty?

Religious Studies

What is the problem of evil?
If God does exist, how can s/he have created a world where evil exists?

Social Studies

How are ideas like “race”, “ethnicity”, “culture” and “religion” connected?
What separates these concepts?

Health Education

What types of friendship are there?
What are the limits of friendship?
What responsibilities does friendship impose?

Values

What is ethics and where does morality come from?
What makes a life ‘good’?
Is happiness the most important value?
Is toleration always right?

Artificial Intelligence

Can computers think?

Politics

What do people mean by anarchy?
Do we need government?
What do the terms ‘right’ and ‘left’ mean in politics?
What is the fairest way for a society to be organised?

Research

Which philosopher interests me most? What was their ‘big idea’?
Do I agree with them?

Science

How/do humans differ from animals?
Is our use and treatment of animals morally justified?
What are our obligations to animals?

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

● Utilise semi-independent research skills to investigate a philosopher and their ideas.
● Actively engage in philosophical discussion through listening or contributing.
● Express understanding of philosophical concepts.

Assessment

Contributions and listening skills in discussion work across the term. Group work across the term. Preparation for lessons. Research project into a Philosopher and their ‘big idea’, and presentation of the research in any format that the student chooses.

Equipment Required

An open and inquiring mind.

An exercise book or folder for notes and handouts.

No Course Fees

The aim of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to take part in physical activity whilst having fun.

At WSC Physical Education is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Harry Hellison (social responsibility and interpersonal factors)
● International Games (a range of games from around the world)
● Teaching Games for Understanding (exploring net/wall, invasion, target and striking and fielding games
● Warrant of Fitness (looking at the effects of exercise and components of fitness)
● Cross Country (looking at different methods of training)
● Summer Sports (using the sports education model)

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

● Demonstrate understanding of the rules and strategies of a variety of Commonwealth Games sports.
● Demonstrate teamwork and interpersonal skills in a group setting with shared goals.

Term 2

● Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of cultural games by practicing and participating in games from around the world.
● Demonstrate consistent application in cross country.

Term 3

● Understand how tactics and strategies can be applied in modified games and sports.
● Demonstrate understanding of basic functional anatomy including naming bones and muscles.

Term 4

● Demonstrates understanding of the rules and strategies of a wide variety of Summer Sports.
● Demonstrates leadership characteristics whilst actively participating in Summer Sports.

Assessment

Throughout the year we use a range of assessment methods. The majority of our assessment is formative (on-going through participation and demonstrating skills such as social responsibility). We do have 2 summative assessments that draw on students’ knowledge of the body (bones and muscles) and the effect exercise has on it. These summative assessments are either written or verbal depending on student choice.

Equipment Required

Physical Education Uniform. To be purchased from the front office.
Shorts – $30
T-Shirt – $40

Course Fees

None

This full year course is taken by all Year 9 students. The course is based on the New Zealand NZC Science Curriculum. It provides an introduction to the four main areas of Science Biology, Chemistry, Physics and on Planet Earth and beyond. The course aims to provide opportunities to introduce and develop student’s investigative and research skills, and to explore a number of socio-scientific issues which are relevant to all New Zealanders.

At WSC Science is offered, through the various sciences, up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content / Course Structure

Nga Taonga o Aotearoa / New Zealands’ Unique Biodiversity
The unique characteristics of NZ native plants and animals is examined, and we discuss our responsibility to prevent their decline or extinction. We use research to determine the reasons so many of NZ’s species are endangered, and what can, and is, being be done about it. In doing so we determining what “living” means scientifically and practice ways of grouping plant and animals scientifically, with an to theassification of plants and animals, an introduction to scientific keys, and the use of microscopes. We appreciate the interdependence of living things by investigating food chains, webs and ecosystems, plant and animal adaptations for survival, investigating plant structure and adaptations for photosynthesis, transpiration, and asexual and sexual reproduction in plants. We explore the the sustainability of an ecosystem and/or identify and undertake an action to increase biodiversity.

Nga Pumotu o Papatuanuku / Elements of our Earth’s Crust
Research into either the history and use of elements, or the environmental consequences of mining. Elements of the Periodic Table, physical properties of metals vs non-metals, uses of elements, making elements and compounds; writing chemical formulae and word equations.

Matariki and Tatai Arorangi / Astronomy
Awareness of Matariki and how Maori used the heavens to measure time for food growing/gathering. Observing and explaining changing positions of the Earth, Moon and Sun in space. Why life evolved on Earth and no other planet in our Solar System.

Te Hiringa / Investigating Energy effcient building design
Types of energy, energy transfer and identifying simple transformations of one kind into another. Changes of state with temperature. Investigating how heat moves.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

For each term, Science teachers select one or more topics from the Course Outline for their teaching programme and assess two of the following Learning Outcomes:

● Use scientific biological grouping to characterise an ecosystem.
● Explore a local environmental issue and make recommendations for action.
● Use a range of scientific symbols, conventions, and vocabulary.
● Make careful observations and differentiate between observation and inference.
● Present evidence on a scientific phenomenon.
● Represent ideas using models, diagrams or graphs.
● Design & carry out a fair test where students gather & interpret data & use that data.
● Communicate scientific ideas clearly .

Assessment

Assignments
Presentations
Practical Assessment
End of Unit Assessment

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$15

Social Studies is about how societies work and how people can participate as critical, active, informed, and responsible citizens. Contexts are drawn from the past, present, and future and from places within and beyond New Zealand.

Social Studies covers Achievement Objectives for Level 4 and 5 from the New Zealand Curriculum.

At WSC Social Studies is offered in the various subject areas in the senior school up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship (i.e. via Classical Studies, Economics, Geography and History).

Course Content

● Our People (multicultural and multifaith New Zealand)
● African Slave Trade and Black Civil Rights
● Power, People and Politics
● Sustainability

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term 1

● Demonstrate understanding of the research process.
● Demonstrate understanding of cultural interaction.

Term 2

● Demonstrate understanding of a significant event.
● Use a variety of skills to show understanding of the African Slave Trade topic.

Term 3

● Demonstrate understanding of two political systems including New Zealand’s.
● Compare and evaluate two different political systems.

Term 4:

● Demonstrate understanding of sustainability.
● Demonstrate understanding of key Social Studies knowledge and skills.

Assessment

In Social Studies students in Year 9 will complete a range of different assessments, which include: paragraph and essay writing, topic tests, group work and social inquiry research.

Equipment Required

For students to succeed in Social Studies they should have the following: A4 exercise book, pens, pencils, eraser, ruler, scissors, coloured pencils and a glue stick.

No Course Fees

This course of te reo Māori aims to equip the student with language tools and knowledge of customs and protocol to confidently participate in conversations in te reo Māori. This half-year option course begins in Term 3. At WSC te reo Māori is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content / Course Structure

By the end of this course, students will be able to cope with a variety of routine situations when talking to speakers of te reo Māori. They will use familiar language with some flexibility and pick up some new language from its context. They will be able to read and write simple notes and short letters and fill out simple forms. They will also use and respond to language, including directions and requests, that is likely to occur in familiar Māori settings. They are becoming more confident in using a range of language learning strategies. They will be aware of and understand some of the typical cultural conventions that operate in interpersonal communication.

All the modes of language learning are covered throughout the year:

● tuhituhi / writing
● kōrero / speaking
● whakarongo / listening
● pānui / reading
● whakaatu / presenting
● mātakitaki / viewing

Learning Outcomes for the Course

(This course runs in Term 3 and 4 only, students will therefore be able to utilise the knowledge and skills they have gained in terms 1 and two of M ā ori Studies.)

Term 3

● Communicate, including comparing and contrasting, about habits, routines and custom.
● Communicate about events and where they take place. Give and follow directions.

Term 4

● Communicate, including comparing and contrasting, about how people travel.
● Communicate about immediate past activities.
● Initiate and sustain conversations in te reo Māori.

Assessment

Major tests include speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, and regular vocabulary tests.

This will require regular homework and grammar and vocabulary revision, as well as online learning.

Equipment Required

None

No Course Fees

This is a half year course comprising of a brief introduction to digital, fabric, food, hard technology and graphic design.

At WSC Technology is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

Using materials (such as: food, fabric, wood, acrylic, metal, paper, ink) to research, develop, design and make a range of outcomes from pre-determined briefs.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

Term A

● Generate own design ideas through sketching and modelling techniques.
● Show an understanding of nutrition in relation to the human body and apply safe food handling practices.
● Use technological procedures using resistant materials to make a specified outcome in a workshop environment.

Term B

● Follow a design process and use a range of fabric skills in developing an original product.
● Demonstrate understanding of a range of 2D and 3D drawing and modelling skills.

Assessment

Learning outcomes and evidence are written for subject specific design and make projects and linked to Level 4 of the Technology curriculum. These form the basis of the Year 9 assessment schedules which assess theoretical knowledge and practical outcomes. The students are assessed against NCEA criteria.

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$90

Year 9 Art course is designed with the Key Competencies integral to preparing students with the fundamental formative skills to pursue the Visual Arts.

At WSC Visual Art is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● The term programme is designed to give students a range of art making experiences in at least three fields. This will include combinations of observational drawing, colour theory, pattern design compositions, intaglio or collograph printing, sgrafitto work, relief sculpture, painting and multi-media formats.
● The programme will recognise toi Maori and tikanga Maori, and the multicultural makeup of students and society by referencing a broad range of traditional and contemporary, local and overseas subject matter as motivation for students to develop ideas.
● Students will develop literacy skills through practical application of Art terminology, teacher lead research of relevant art models and student evaluation.
● Combinations of the following four Level 4 achievement objectives will be addressed:
– Developing Practical Knowledge in the Visual Arts;
– Developing Ideas in the Visual Arts;
– Communicating and Interpreting the Visual Arts;
– Understanding the Visual Arts in Context.

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

● Demonstrate control and understanding of different artistic media in the Development of work.
● Combine observational drawings and pattern in a compositional design.
● Produce a resolved series of art works.

Assessment

Learning outcomes and evidence are written for each task and linked to Level 4 of the Visual Arts curriculum. These form the basis of the Year 9 assessment schedules. The students are assessed against the criteria of not achieved, achieved, achieved with merit and achieved with excellence categories.

Equipment Required

None

No Course Fees

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