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The Course or Subject Name

The Timetable Provision for the Subject (E.g. Language Option, 1 Term, 3 Lessons a Week)

A Brief Overview of the Course

A Note on How the Subject Continues on throughout the school. (E.g. “At WSC Dance is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.)

Course Content/ Course Structure

(A brief outline of the main sections of the course.)

Learning Outcomes (LOs) for the Course

(With the Learning Dispositions (LDs) relating to conduct, effort and organisation, these Los will be used to generate the termly Learning Reports. Students will be given an Excellence, Merit, Achieved or Not Achieved for each of the LOs they have worked on during the term.)

Assessment

(The variety of assessment methods that are used in the course. Note, not all assessment will be linked to LOs.)

NCEA Standards

The numbers, names and details of any NCEA AS that students will take in this course. Some compulsory and option subjects include Ass in their Year 10 courses, others do not.

Equipment Required

(If students will need to bring any specialist equipment for the course it will be noted here).

No Course Fees

(If there are any course fees they will be noted here.)

English (4 hours a week for the year)
Health Education (1 hour a week for the year)
Mathematics* (4 hours a week for the year)
Physical Education (2 hours a week for the year)
Science (4 hours a week for the year)
Social Studies (3 hours a week for the year)

The remaining 6 hours of the Year 10 timetable are made up option subjects.

Students take either:

4 option subjects, with each option running half a year and involving 3 hours of lesson time a

week;

or,

1 whole year language option involving 3 hours of lessons a week over the full four terms, and 2 half-year options running half a year and involving 3 hours of lesson time a week

COURSE SELECTION

Students should make an informed decision about their option choices, and must have their parents’ agreement. The information in this booklet will be of use here, but students may also benefit from discussing their options with relevant teachers and Heads of Department as well as their Head of House. The Senior Course Book, also on the school website and intranet, gives information on possible progression routes in a subject.

The number of classes running in an option depends on student demand. Occasionally, if there is very limited demand, a course will not run.

COURSE RECOMMENDATIONS

Western Springs College recommends that students take a ‘balanced’ course in the junior school. What we mean by this is that students and parents should be mindful of the following:

  1. Choose a range of subjects so that you are still able to have a broad curriculum at this stage of your learning.
  2. If you think you may want to study Chinese or French in Year 11 you will need to choose that language as one of your options in Year 10. Apart from Sports Academy no other Year 11 courses have prerequisites.

MULTI-LEVELLING AND ACCELERATION

Students are encouraged to study at levels appropriate to their ability. In some cases this may mean pursuing courses (core or option) beyond their year level. If you think this is relevant to you please contact Graeme Moran ( morang@wsc.school.nz ), the Accelerated Students Coordinator, or speak to your Head of House. Please also note on the option form that this is something you are thinking of.

Please note spaces and timetabling may restrict opportunities for acceleration in particular subjects, and this cannot be confirmed until the 2107 timetable is set. It is therefore important that all students, even those who may be accelerated, complete the option form by the Week 6 deadline.

COURSE CHANGES & LIMITED SPACES IN COURSES

In most cases students should be able to do the courses they have chosen but in rare cases you may be put into a different course because of limited spaces. If you are not happy with your course or you missed out on a place in the course you selected then please discuss this first  with your form teacher or Head of House. Please note that you cannot just drop a subject or request a change, you must discuss this with your Head of House.

HOMEWORK

Western Springs College has a homework policy to develop sound study habits and raise student achievement, this involves an average of one hour per night for juniors.

SUPPORT WITH LEARNING

  • Homework Centres are run through the school library, the Learning Centre and departments.
  • The Library is open for students Monday to Friday 8.00a.m to 4.30pm
  • The Learning Centre is also available for students who would like help with examination technique, study skills, revision skills and essay writing.

Compulsory Courses

Our vision is to introduce and develop in our students the attitudes, skills and knowledge required to become confident, articulate and thoughtful members of New Zealand society. Success in English is fundamental to success across the curriculum, as all learning areas require students to receive, process and present ideas using English as a medium.

By understanding how language works, young people can learn to make appropriate language choices and apply them in a range of contexts. Through studying and enjoying a diverse range of texts, students can develop a stronger sense of their own identity in the world, and an appreciation of their rich multicultural heritage. Note that the Year 10 course is part of a two-year programme at WSC arranged to cover the English Curriculum in depth.

At WSC English is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

Our course is designed to develop students’ skills in the following areas:

● Listening
● Reading
● Viewing
● Speaking
● Writing
● Presenting

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Each term, English teachers will choose a unifying theme or topic on which to base their programme and will teach and assess two of the following Learning Outcomes:

● Develop formal writing skills
● Respond to written text(s)
● Respond to visual text(s)
● Close reading of written text(s)
● Close viewing of visual text(s)
● Present ideas in a visual form
● Respond to 6 texts for AS 90854 * (in each of Terms 1, 2 and 3)
● Construct and deliver a speech to an audience for AS 90857 * (Term 4)

(*Details of the two Level 1 standards are given below)

Assessment

Students are assessed through class tests, oral presentations, visual presentations, essays, group tasks and assignments.

NCEA Standards

In year 10, students will attempt two Level 1 Achievement Standards:

AS90857 V1 Construct and deliver an oral text – which will involve writing and delivering a 3 minute speech in term four.

AS90854 V1 Form personal responses to independently read texts – which will involve writing two brief logs on books and films in each of the first three terms. (6 in total)

Equipment Required

1B5 exercise book, pens & pencils.

No Course Fees

The aim of this course is to develop students understanding health issues and the underlying concepts of health (hauora, the socio-ecological perspective, health curriculum ‘attitudes and values’, and health promotion).

Students will build their resilience through further developing their self-management skills and by engaging in processes for responsible decision-making. They learn to evaluate the impacts that social and cultural factors have on relationships and they develop the skills to identify and access community agencies.

At WSC Health is offered up to Level 3 NCEA.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Group processes – effective groups and being an effective group member.
● Resiliency Building – listening skills, risk identification and management, sexual harassment, cyber safety.
● Alcohol – reflect on current influences on alcohol issues, choices and behaviours; investigate contributing factors and the impact on self, others and society; develop strategies to keep self and others safe.
● Drugs –work effectively in a large group when planning and implementing a debate on marijuana legislation, examine NZ law in relation to other drugs and the effects on well-being.
● Sexuality – relationship and sexuality safety and risk management (including rights and responsibilities), adolescent reproductive development, contraception, STI’s, support and helping agencies.
● Stress management.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Note: Teachers will select 3 Learning Outcomes for each term.

TERM 1

● Demonstrate understanding of procedures and strategies to manage cyber safety.
● Demonstrate knowledge of a range of skills and processes to make safe choices for themselves and other people.
● Demonstrate knowledge of school and community services to support well-being.
● Describe options to achieve positive outcomes in interactions with others.
● Demonstrate effective self-management strategies in group situations.

TERM 2

● Investigate and evaluates adolescent attitudes and behaviours that affect alcohol choices and drinking patterns.
● Demonstrate skills to collate and accurately interpret data.
● Use effective self-management to meet deadlines.
● Demonstrate a range of effective interpersonal skills when working with-in a group.
● Ask question and challenge assumptions and perceptions of alcohol issues.

TERM 3

● Develop a creative presentation that informs others on possible influences on the drinking patterns of adolescents.
● Actively participate in a presentation informing others on potential health issues or risk management in situations involving alcohol.
● Use enquiry skills to research valid and reliable information for the marijuana debate.
● Demonstrate skills for delegating, prioritising, task completion and organisation.
● Actively contribute to small and large group tasks.

TERM 4

● Demonstrate understanding of rights and responsibilities for achieving positive outcomes in relationships
● Describe effective strategies for managing risk situations
● Demonstrate understanding of possible impacts of health issues on the well-being of self and others.
● Demonstrate effective and appropriate interpersonal skills within a range of contexts
● Demonstrate effective self-management strategies.

Assessment

Throughout the year we use a range of assessment methods. Formative assessment is ongoing throughout the year, it includes participation in class and group discussions and activities.

● There are three summative assessments during the year:
● Cyber safety – create a ‘webpage’ on cyber safety
● Alcohol Presentation – collating class responses and reporting back on current alcohol related issues. Teacher assessment of collation and evaluation; peer assessment of presentation.-Group Processes Demonstrate skills for being an effective group member.

NCEA Standards

None

Equipment Required

WA4 Exercise book

No Course Fees

The course consists of 3 strands; Number and Algebra, Geometry and Measure, and Statistics and Probability based on the New Zealand Mathematics Curriculum.

The aim of this course is to extend students Mathematical knowledge while at the same time developing their creative, critical, strategic and logical thinking skills.

Students will also be introduced to NCEA internal standards as well as the layout of the external standards.

This course prepares students to take a full NCEA Level 1 Mathematics course in Y11.

At WSC Calculus, Statistics and General Mathematics is offered up to Level 3 NCEA, and both Calculus and Statistics at Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

The 3 strands are divided into 6 units for teaching and assessment purposes.

Term 1

Number : number properties and operations, BEDMAS, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and problem solving.
Probability : working with probabilities, estimating outcomes, using the PPDAC cycle to investigate probability.

Term 2

Algebraic Manipulation : simplify algebraic expressions, expanding and factorising, solving equations and substitution into formulae.
Sequences and Graphs : algebraic formulae of a sequence, plotting graphs, gradient of a line, y-intercept, and equation of a line.

Term 3

Geometry and Measures : angle construction, angle theory and geometric reasoning, Pythagoras and trigonometry
Revision : how to revise for Mathematics external exams, use of past papers, finding resources and identifying areas in need of work.

Term 4

Statistics ; PPDAC cycle and bivariate (2 variables) data

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1

● Apply numeric reasoning in solving problems.
● Investigate and apply various methods in situations involving probability.

Term 2

● Apply algebraic procedures in solving problems.
● Investigate relationships between tables, equations and graphs.

Term 3

● Conduct an investigation into a problem using geometry and measurement.
● Act on feedback and use revision to progress their learning and achievement.

Term 4

● Investigate numerical data using the statistical enquiry cycle.
● Develop independent study skills through completion of homework and revision.

Assessment

This course is assessed using a mixture of end of topic tests, investigational projects, exams in Term 3 and 4, ongoing teacher in class assessment and two Level 1 NCEA achievement standards.

NCEA Standards

Term 1

1.1 (AS91026 v3) Apply numeric reasoning in solving problems. (4 Credits.)

Term 4

1.11 (AS91036 v3) Investigate bivariate numerical data using the statistical enquiry cycle. (3 credits)

Where necessary students will have the opportunity to retake and improve their results in these standards in Year 11.

Equipment Required

Scientific Calculator; Ruler and Protractor. Internet access at home or through homework centres at school.

Course Fees

$30.00 – Covers registration for Maths buddy the online homework system that we subscribe to and other resources.

The course consists of 3 strands; Number and Algebra, Geometry and Measure, and Statistics and Probability based on the New Zealand Mathematics Curriculum.

The aim of this course is to extend students Mathematical knowledge while at the same time developing their creative, critical, strategic and logical thinking skills.

This is a full NCEA Level 1 Mathematics course which includes 4 external standards and prepares students to take NCEA level 2 Advanced Mathematics in year 11.

At WSC Calculus, Statistics and General Mathematics are offered up to Level 3 NCEA, and both Calculus and Statistics at Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

Term 1

Sequences and Graphs : algebraic formulae of a sequence, plotting graphs, equations of linear and graphs.
Algebraic Manipulation : simplify algebraic expressions, expanding and factorising, solving equations, Inequalities and substitution into formulae.

Term 2

Multivariate Statistics : PPDAC cycle and Multivariate data

Term 3

Number: n umber operations, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and problem solving.
Geometry and Measures : Pythagoras, trigonometry including 3-dimensional problems and geometric reasoning.

Term 4

Revision : how to revise for Mathematics external exams, use of past papers, finding resources and identifying areas in need of work.
Statistics and Probability : interpreting graphs and data and understanding probability.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1

● Apply algebraic procedures in solving problems.
● Investigate relationships between tables, equations and graphs.

Term 2

● Investigate a given multivariate data set using the statistical enquiry cycle.
● Use appropriate technologies in solving problems.

Term 3

● Apply numeric reasoning in solving problems.
● Apply geometry reasoning in solving problems.

Term 4

● Demonstrate understanding of chance and data.
● Investigate bivariate numerical data using the statistical enquiry cycle.

Assessment

This course is assessed using a mixture of end of topic tests, investigational projects teacher in class assessment and NCEA achievement standards.

The NCEA achievement standards consist of 3 internal assessment, an external exam in September, and 3 NCEA external exams in November.

NCEA Standards

Term 1

1.2 External (AS91027 v4) Apply algebraic procedures in solving problems. (4 credits)

1.6 External (AS91031 v3) Apply geometric reasoning in solving problems. (4 credits)

Term 2

1.3 Internal (AS91029 v3) Apply linear algebra in solving problems. (3 credits)

1.10 Internal (AS91035 v3) Investigate a given multivariate data set using statistical enquiry cycle. (4 credits)

Term 3

1.1 Internal (AS91026 v3) Apply numeric reasoning in solving problems. (4 credits)

1.12 External (AS91037 v2) Demonstrate understanding of chance and data. (4 credits)

Term 4

1.11 Internal (AS91036 v2) Investigate bivariate numerical data using the statistical enquiry cycle. (3 credits)

Equipment Required

Scientific Calculator.

Ruler and Protractor.

Course Fees

$30.00 – Covers the NCEA level 1 Nulake homework book and other revision resources.

$ 76.60 – NZQA entry fee (2014 cost)

In year 10 Physical Education we build from the previous year’s knowledge. We explore different activities with the aim that students will become more aware of leading a physically active lifestyle. Our aim is to prepare students for level 1 NCEA Physical Education.

At WSC Physical Education is offered up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Omnikin and Social Responsibility.
● Transform Your Life (exploring lifestyle and how to become more active) Te Ao Kori (investigating traditional Maori games).
● It’s In The Game (creating and running a unique game).
● Aussie Rules (looking at skills through Australian rules football).
● Touch (using the sports education model – student lead sessions).
● Anatomy and the human body.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1

● Demonstrates interpersonal skills when participating in a team games.
● Demonstrate effort and involvement by learning traditional Maori Games.

Term 2

● Demonstrate a range of interpersonal skills when working in small groups to create a unique game.
● Plan, organise and run a unique game that can be played by all members of the class.

Term 3

● Demonstrate understanding of basic functional anatomy including naming bones, muscles and anatomical movements.
● Arrive fully prepared to take part in PE, with uniform, and equipment, and preparatory tasks completed.

Term 4

● Demonstrates understanding of the roles and responsibilities of team management and apply this to a Touch context.
● Demonstrates a variety of leadership skills that contribute to the success of their team whilst playing and training for Touch.

Assessment

Throughout the year we use a range of assessment methods. The majority of our assessment is formative (on-going through participation and demonstrating skills such as interpersonal skills). We do have 1 summative assessment that draws on students’ knowledge of the body (anatomical movement). There are also 2 skill-based assessments. In one assessment students complete a timed cross-country run. In the second students are graded on their performance of Australian rules football.

NCEA Standards

None

Equipment Required

Physical Education Uniform. To be purchased from the front office.

● Shorts – $30
● T-Shirt – $40

No Course Fees

This is a full year course is taken by all Year 10 students. The aim of the course is to develop Science literacy and investigative skills at level 5 of the New Zealand Curriculum. The units of work are based on Learning Outcomes from the 4 different content strands of Science with an overarching focus on the Nature of Science.

At WSC Science is offered through the various science subject areas of Biology, Chemistry and Physics, up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship. Science also leads to General Science into Environmental Sustainability courses, which are offered at WSC in Levels 2 and 3.

Course Content / Course Structure

Tinana / Our Healthy Bodies
Nutrition, health & diseases as a result of poor lifestyle choices. The human digestive system, and associated impacts on the respiratory and circulatory systems of poor diet choices. Research will be into a current health issue related to diet.

Waiora / Our Precious Water
Water is used as a context to examine issues of water supply or contamination. The context requires understanding of the chemistry of atoms, molecules, elements and compounds, including electron behaviour in ionisation.

Hikohiko / Electricity in our Homes
Research into the generation of electricity and/or energy conservation in NZ. Introduction to simple electrical circuits, and investigating how electrical resistance changes in circuits as more things are plugged into the same socket.

Waikawa/ Ocean Acidification
Human effect on balanced ecological processes, ocean acidification and Global warming. The effects of burning fossil fuels, investigations into photosynthesis and combustion. Testing of substances to determine which are acids or bases. Making and using an indicator. Chemical reactions of acids – especially with carbonates.

Taikaha / Balloons and Rockets
Working scientifically, designing and carrying out investigations into moving things to understand the action of forces.

Papatuanuku / Forces that Shape our Land
Geological history of NZ and plate tectonics. The formation of NZ’s volcanoes, particularly the Auckland Volcanic Field. A local field trip.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Each term, science teachers will choose two or three of the following learning outcomes to report to parents. The report will indicate the progress each student is making.

● Represent ideas using models, diagrams or graphs.
● Evaluate a range of sources of information prepared for the public for validity and bias.
● Communicate scientific ideas clearly.
● Understand that scientists’ investigations are informed by current scientific theories.
● Gather and interpret data.
● Design and carry out a fair test.
● Represent ideas about the organ systems of the body using models.
● Identify the key structural features and functions involved in the life processes of complex animals.
● Develop an understanding of socio-scientific issues related to preventable disease.
● Explore an environmental issue relating to water and make recommendations for action.
● Use evidence to explain a scientific theory.
● Use evidence to explain how local landforms &/or processes form with the help of models.

Assessment

  • Assignments
  • Presentations
  • Practical Assessments
  • End of Unit Assessments

NCEA Standards

None

Equipment Required

Normal stationery requirements in order to maintain a complete and ordered record of work from which to revise for tests.

No Course Fees

$15 – Day trip around features of the Auckland Volcanic Zone.

Social Studies is about how societies work and how people can participate as critical, active, informed, and responsible citizens. Contexts are drawn from the past, present, and future and from places within and beyond New Zealand.

This subject is a full-year course, with three lessons a week. It covers Achievement Objective Level 5 from the NZ curriculum.

At WSC Social Studies is offered in the various subject areas in the senior school up to Level 3 NCEA and Scholarship (i.e. via Classical Studies, Economics, Geography and History).

Course Content

● Nazi Germany
● Human Rights
● New Zealand History
● Development – Unequal world

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term1

● Demonstrate understanding of Hitler’s main ideas and methods of control.
● Demonstrate understanding of Social Studies research skills.

Term 2

● Carry out an investigation of a current human rights issue.
● Demonstrate understanding of a current human rights issue.

Term 3

● Demonstrate understanding of the planning process.
● Demonstrate understanding of significant NZ events/people.

Term 4

● Demonstrate understanding of developed and developing countries.
● Demonstrate understanding of key Social Studies knowledge and skills.

Assessment

In Social Studies students in Year 10 will complete a range of different assessments, which include: paragraph and essay writing, topic tests, recognising different perspectives and social inquiry research.

NCEA Standards

None

Equipment Required

For students to succeed in Social Studies they should have the following:

A4 exercise book, pens, pencils, eraser, ruler, scissors, coloured pencils and a glue stick.

No Course Fees

Year 10 Options

Full-Year Language Courses

There are prerequisites for these courses.

All courses can lead to Level 1, 2 and 3 NCEA courses, and all Level 3 courses provide 14 or more NCEA credits in a university-approved subject.

If students wish to take Chinese or French at NCEA in Year 11 they must take the same

language as a full-year Year 10 option.

This course is a full-year course, with lessons three times weekly. It covers up to Level 6 of the new curriculum developing useful communication skills.

Course Content/ Course Structure

Chinese culture is introduced through the relevant topics, and vocabulary is extended through a range of learning activities: videos; songs and language websites.

Regular learning and revision including online work is necessary.

Topics:
● Talking about Self
● Family & Pets
● Hobbies & Sports
● School life
● Seasons & Weather
● Shopping

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1

1) Recognise required Chinese characters for body parts, appearance and personality.
2) Write a short essay about ‘self’ in Chinese with the support of resources.

Term 2

1) Listen and understand spoken Chinese about family and pets.
2) Read and understand written Chinese about family and pets.

Term 3

1) Listen and understand spoken Chinese about hobbies and sports.
2) Read and understand written Chinese about hobbies and sports.

Term 4

1) Write in Chinese with images about school life, with support of resources.
2) Deliver a weather report presentation in Chinese with visual support.

Assessment

Assessments focused on four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) and will be done following NCEA format.

Equipment Required

course required workbook ( Jinbu 1 )
A4 size exercise book (for handouts and notes)
B5 size exercise book (for homework & short tests)

Course Fees

About $20

Prerequisites
Prior learning/knowledge in Year 9 or at the discretion of the Head of Department.

This is a full-year course, with lessons three times weekly. It covers up to Level 6 of the new curriculum developing a ‘survival kit’ of useful communication skills.

Course Content/ Course Structure

An understanding of French culture is developed in class with research assignments, and vocabulary is extended by introducing a range of learning activities: videos; songs and language websites. Regular revision of class work is necessary.

Topics:

● Weather and Clothes
● Talking about self
● School life
● Food and Snacks
● Leisure activities
● Holidays
● Dreams for the future

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1:

1) Demonstrate understanding of a variety of short spoken French texts.
2) Demonstrate understanding of a variety of short written French texts.
3) Demonstrate involvement with French speaking activities.

Term 2:

1) Give a spoken presentation in French.
2) Demonstrate involvement with French speaking activities.

Term 3:

1) Demonstrate thorough understanding of a variety of short spoken French texts. 2) Demonstrate thorough understanding of a variety of long written French texts.
3) Demonstrate involvement with French speaking activities.

Term 4:

1) Write a text in French about myself.
2) Demonstrate involvement with French speaking activities.

Assessment

Assessments focus on four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening), and will be done following NCEA format.

Equipment Required

Access to online homework website
A4 size exercise book

Course Fees

About $20 for electronic resource access

Prerequisites

Prior learning/knowledge in Year 9 or at the discretion of the Teacher in Charge of French and/or Head of Department of Languages.

This course aims to provide a foundation and base for Level 1 NCEA Te Reo Māori and aligns with levels 1-4 of the Te Reo Māori Curriculum document. The development of Te Reo Māori speakers is an integral part of today’s society and this course assists in extending the skills of the beginning language learner.

Course Content / Course Structure

The module topics are combined with a language programme to develop students’ fluency and accuracy and to enhance their confidence to speak te reo in a variety of situations. Vocabulary is extended by introducing a range of learning activities: videos, songs and language websites. Regular revision of class work is necessary.

All the modes of language learning are covered throughout the year:

  • tuhituhi / writing
  • kōrero / speaking,
  • whakarongo / listening,
  • pānui / reading,
  • whakaatu / presenting,
  • mātakitaki / viewing

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term 1

  1. Use and respond to simple classroom language.
  2. Communicate about personal information, such as name, parents’ and grandparents ’names, iwi, hapū, mountain, and river, or home town and place of family origin.
  3. Communicate by comparing and contrasting habits.
  4. Communicate by comparing and contrasting routines.

Term 2

  1. Communicate by comparing and contrasting customs.
  2. Communicate immediate past events.
  3. Communicate about past activities and events.
  4. Describe, compare and contrast people, places and things.

Term 3

  1. Distinguish between past and present actions and states.
  2. Use appropriate writing conventions.
  3. Communicate about time, weather and seasons.
  4. Make use of context and familiar language to work out meaning and relationships between things, events, and ideas.

Term 4

  1. Use possessive pronouns appropriately, in a group activity.
  2. Communicate about physical characteristics, personality, and feelings.
  3. Discuss topics of mutual interest.
  4. Use appropriate writing conventions.

Assessment

Major tests include speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, and regular vocabulary tests.

This will require regular homework and grammar and vocabulary revision, as well as online learning

Equipment Required

It is advised that students purchase a copy of “The Raupo Pocket Dictionary of Modern Māori” (P.M Ryan) from bookstores or download a Māori dictionary ‘app’ onto their devices for use.

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

Prior learning/knowledge in Year 9 or at the discretion of the Head of Department.


Te Reo Rangatira

Students already proficient in Te Reo Māori should discuss with their Year 9 Māori Studies teacher the possibility of taking Te Reo Rangatira in Year 10 instead of Te Reo Māori.

Half-Year Non-Language Courses

Apart from Sports Academy, there are no prerequisites for these courses. (Students wishing must participate in school sport/s, and the number of students admitted to the course is limited.)

All courses can lead to Level 1, 2 and 3 NCEA courses, and all the related Level 3 courses (with the exception of Sports Academy) provide 14 or more NCEA credits in a university approved subject.

Students can pick up any of these subjects at NCEA in Year 11 without taking the related Year 10 Option in that subject.

This course is an introduction to the commercial world in which we live and offers students a hands-on approach a variety of interesting topics. It covers many basic Accounting, Marketing and Economic concepts, which also enables students to obtain a feel for both Accounting and Economics prior to the selection of Year 11 courses.

This course aims to ensure students get an insight into running a small business and also gain everyday financial literacy skills such as budgeting, taxation and knowing the basics of investing.

Course Content/ Course Structure

An introduction to Financial Literacy through the study of:
● Business Structures
● Marketing
● Basics of Economics and Accounting
● Running a small business
● Excel Statements
● Introduction to the Share Market
● Buying a house
● Calculating Tax
● Budgeting
● Project – How much you cost your parents
● Credit Basics

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A:

1) Demonstrate understanding of the skills and attributes of Entrepreneurs.
2) Understand the principles for good consumer investment decision-making.
3) Understand and apply fundamental economic concepts and models.

Term B:

1) Understand and apply marketing concepts.
2) Analyse accounting transactions and prepare financial statements.
3) Understand and apply accounting concepts.

Assessment

Through posters, oral presentations, class tests, group tasks and assignments.

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

Dance is offered as an option for year 9 and 10 and as an NCEA subject for years 11, 12 and 13. At year 10 the course is mostly practical and gives students foundational Dance skills and knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to attend class trips to see live dance and to perform in the Junior Arts Festival.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Perform Dance: students will learn performance skills in a range of dance styles, including contemporary and hip hop.
● Choreograph Dance: students will develop choreographic skills through the making of group and pair dance sequences.
● Interpret Dance: using dance as a medium for communication, students will learn to interpret and respond to the dance of others.

The Year 10 Dance course incorporates the four strands of the curriculum:

● Developing Practical Knowledge in Dance
● Developing Ideas in Dance
● Communicating and Interpreting Dance
● Understanding Dance in Context

Achievement Objectives for the Course

Term A:

1) Learn and demonstrate personal skills and group skills in dance.
2) Manipulate the dance elements to create effective dance sequences.

Term B:

1) Learn and demonstrate performance skills in dance.
2) Learn and demonstrate choreography skills in dance.

Assessment

Assessment is by:
Performing group dances
Choreographing dance sequences with others
Reflection of self-management and contribution to group.

Equipment Required

PE gear and exercise book

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

Year 10 Drama focuses on developing skills learned in Year 9. There is an emphasis on performance and students are given the opportunity to perform in the Junior Arts Festival and the Ponsonby Intermediate Arts Trip.

The aim of the course is to gain a great understanding of the techniques and conventions of Drama and to use them effectively to strengthen performances. At level 5 to 6 of the NZ curriculum, students are expected to select the techniques, conventions and technologies effectively, initiate and develop ideas and make critical judgements about the features and meaning of drama.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Theatre Sports
● Devised Theatre
● Theatre Form
● Physical Theatre
● Acting Technique
● Performance in the Junior Arts Festival and Ponsonby Intermediate Arts Trip

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Show evidence of the skills required to perform theatre sports.
2) Use physical skills and drama conventions to devise and perform theatre.

Term B

1) Create and perform a clown scene.
2) Perform a script in a naturalistic style.

Assessment

Theatre Sports – Performance skills
Devised Theatre – Devising skills and Performance skills
Theatre Form – Performance
Acting Technique – Performance and Journal skills – Achievement Standard 1.1(4 x credits for year 11)

NCEA Standards

Achievement Standard 90006 – 1.1

Apply Drama techniques in a dramatic context – 4 Credits

Students are assessed in the style of NCEA with Not Achieved – Excellence. Credits gained for 90006 will be transferred to the students’ records of learning for the following year.

Equipment Required

Comfortable, supportive clothing

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

Media Studies is offered as a junior option for years 9 and 10 and as a senior subject for years 11, 12 and 13, which can lead to the study of the Media and/or film and television at university and other tertiary institutions. This course runs for two terms and builds on any media knowledge you already have. You will complete two modules. There is a practical element to the course and you will be using the camera in each term.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Revise your practical skills and build on knowledge and skills you already have.
● Use the cameras and editing software.
● Strengthen your collaboration and group work skills.
● Study the features of a genre (a ‘type’ of film or TV programme).
● Plan and create short film (including a genre film).
● Critically evaluate your own films and the group process.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A:

1) Demonstrate understanding of how media conventions/techniques are used in media text/s.
2) Demonstrate an ability to work with others on a media production.

Term B

1) Demonstrate further understanding of how media conventions/techniques are used in media text/s.
2) Demonstrate an ability to work with others on a media production.

Assessment

Students will be assessed over a variety of tasks, having multiple opportunities to show their understanding of media conventions (techniques) through analysing their own and other’s’ work. They will work toward a summative grade assessing their contribution to the group production process (how well they collaborate on and contribute to the making of the short film projects).

Equipment Required

None – although students may use their own camera and tripod if they wish.

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

This course begins to emphasise composing and performing your own music. Topics such as the Blues, World Music and The Big Old Names in music provide the inspiration and structure for student compositions. Composition notation can be done by hand or via a number of software programmes.

Students in this course have first priority for instrument lessons on the itinerant teachers in music programme. In class we will focus on guitar, keyboard and percussion with additions based on the makeup of the class.

Listening and practical work covers a variety of musical styles and just about any style is acceptable for individual performance!

Emphasis is on preparation for Year 11 although students who do not wish to continue with music may also take this course.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● World music
● The Blues
● Elements of music
● Song Analysis
● Film/Story music
● Eras of Classical music
● Theme and Variation

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Compose, rehearse and perform structured pieces of music.
2) Demonstrate and apply understanding of musical elements, theory and technologies.

Term B

1) Further develop composition, rehearsal and performance techniques.
2) Apply understanding of theme and variation across musical elements, theory and technologies.

Assessment

Via aural, theory, composition and performance.

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

This half-year Year 10 course includes an NCEA Achievement Standard. It aims to introduce you to a range of philosophical themes, concepts and thinkers, as well as developing logical ways of thinking. It also aims to enable you to consider your world from a fresh perspective, to make connections across traditional subject areas, and to learn to question what you are told.

Philosophy is offered as a Year 10 Option, and after that as a full NCEA course in Years 11, 12 and 13 with full University Entrance status. Although there is a Year 9 option, you do not need to have taken this in order to opt into the Year 10 course.

Course Content/ Course Structure

Logic and Critical Thinking: How do arguments work? How can they go wrong? What makes a good argument? How do you identify bad arguments?
Ethics: Is there such a thing as ‘goodness’, and if so what does it mean to be good? How can we decide what is the right thing to do? Should we allow boxing? Should we all be vegetarian? Is animal testing justified? Should people have to pay tax? Should we execute people?
Human Nature: Do humans differ from animals, and if so how? Do humans have something that artificial intelligence (ICT machines) could not have? Could a machine think? Could a human survive the destruction of their body?
Philosophy of Religion: Is belief in God rational? Is there life after death?
Eastern Philosophy: Suffering, karma, rebirth and enlightenment in Buddhist thought.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A:

1) Research a set philosophical theme and present findings in a written, oral or audio-visual format.
2) Actively engage in philosophical discussion through listening and contributing.
3) Express understanding of philosophical concepts and apply those concepts to actual situations.

Term B:

1) Complete AS90819 – Describe key beliefs of a religious tradition.
2) Critically question philosophical concepts by reporting on a set philosophical theme with limited support, clustering and linking ideas in a logical manner.

Assessment

Video presentations, extended structured writing, slide-show production, and debating/discussion activities.

Students will complete a 6-credit NCEA assessment.

NCEA Standards

Buddhism – Karma, Rebirth and Nirvana

AS 90819 – Describe key beliefs of a religious tradition – 6 Credits

Written report, speech or audio-visual presentation.

Equipment Required

An open mind, and an interest in the world around you. A willingness to listen to others and a desire to develop your discussion skills. Self-motivation and a determination to build your independent research skills.

Course Fees

None

Prerequisites

None

Students participate in an outdoor event developing their swimming and running skills. Students will gain understanding about the importance of warm up/cool down, exercise techniques and fitness testing. Students develop strong leadership skills through a unit called ‘Survivor’. Confidence and integrity are important skills that are integral to lifelong learning which are closely focused on throughout. All students are to aspire to their full potential.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Swimming tests
● Fitness testing and body response studies
● Warm up, Cool down, Stretching
● Sport specific goal setting
● Leadership skills
● Confidence in the outdoors
● Expedition – this is a 2 day camp.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Practice and perform in an aquathon event.
2) Demonstrate organisational skills and responsible attitudes when participating in a practical setting.

Term B

1) Demonstrate leadership qualities through outdoor activities (survivor).
2) Consistently demonstrate organisational skills and responsible attitudes when participating in a practical setting.

Assessment

Practical assessment Written/oral assessments Equipment Required
Suitable practical footwear, togs, goggles.

Course Fees

$220 (Includes most camp costs, Sports Academy t-shirt, and other activity costs).

Prerequisites

Effort, participation and dedication in all other areas of school life. Discussion with other teachers and head of house will take place to see if students meet the criteria. Playing sports at Western Springs College is encouraged.

This is a half year course comprising an Introduction to designing products and spaces, the Design Process, Rendering and Freehand Sketching The aim of this year is to help to equip students with essential DVC skills and knowledge.

Course Content/ Course Structure

The course will allow students to build up their knowledge of Graphics and Design Techniques. This course is recommended to students who are interested in product, environmental and architectural designing. In the second term of the course students also learn to use a 3D computer modelling package to design and present architectural ideas.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Rapidly visualise objects and draw them freehand in a variety of ways.
2) Apply shading and texture rendering to two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects.
3) Successfully draw in isometric and two-point perspective.

Term B

1) Communicate effectively using visual methods.
2) Create realistic interpretations of designs using graphics techniques.
3) Create realistic scale models of designs using a range of modelling materials.

Assessment

Ongoing observation

Assignments

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$25.00 – provides for a graphics kit and consumable resources.

Prerequisites

None

This is a half year course comprising of an Introduction to digital information technology and digital design.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Within the digital technology course, students are exposed to a variety of concepts through programming and robotics, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator
● The year 10 digital technology course is a good introduction to what students could expect in year 11 with a focus on programming and design development using CAD.
● The course will allow students to build up their knowledge of how to manipulate and use digital technology to produce design outcomes. This course is recommended to students who are interested in computers for processing, designing and presentation as well as programming and robotics.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Use research to underpin the design of a product.
2) Implement skills in software, producing a file which can be manufactured on a CNC machine.
3) Demonstrate the ability to work in a group environment to solve problems.

Term B

1) Develop skills in Adobe Photoshop, having the ability to represent a myth or legend from students background.
2) Use feedback from peers in order to develop a design.
3) Understand and implement basic programming concepts.

Assessment

Ongoing observation, 3 project assignments

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$20.00 – this goes towards equipment

Prerequisites

None

This course is designed to give students the confidence and knowledge to be able to prepare their own meals in their home for themselves and their family/ friends. They are also taught the importance of making positive food choices and understanding the affects their food choices can have on their future well-being.

Course Content/ Course Structure

The course is broken into 3 key modules, which aim to equip the students with basic domestic theory and practical cookery skills.

● Happy Food Happy Life

The first module teaches students the importance of safe food hygiene practices and discusses the significance of food choices in our daily lives. What foods should we eat and why? How do we make good life choices that reduce or eliminate our chances of contracting diseases such as diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity? Students will also cook nutritious and cost effective meals that will set them up for their future.

● Foods around the World

The Second module takes the class on a trip around the globe learning about different countries cuisine. This includes learning the different countries’ key flavours, ingredients, cooking equipment and of course cooking famous dishes from each country.

● Organic Breakfasts.

This module encourages a mindfulness of where we source food from and what we put in our body. With a focus on food sustainability . Students design and make a sustainable organic breakfast while learning about the importance of making sustainable choices in today’s society.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Implement practical procedures to demonstrate good food health and safety and confidence in cooking skills.
2) Demonstrate understanding of dietary challenges facing young people.

Term B

1) Develop an understanding of different countries’ cuisines.
2) Design and make an organic breakfast dish.

Assessment

Assignments
Presentations
Practical cookery
Teacher observation

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$90.00 – provides for all ingredients

Prerequisites

None

Emphasis will be placed on design and manufacture with the aim of improving knowledge of the design process and increasing experience and skills in the workshop. Students will have the opportunity to apply technological principles whilst designing and making products.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● The aim of this year is to help to equip students with essential Hard Technology skills and knowledge.
● Students will work on design elements and make projects, which build on the skills introduced during Year 9.
● Students will aim to improve their ability to organise and plan their work in order to meet given deadlines. The operating mode is one in which design is viewed as a problem solving activity.
● Students are taught how to identify key concepts and to formulate essential design criteria that their designs should meet.
● Research and information gathering techniques are used to help accumulate appropriate information in order to help in the problem solving process.
● Students will make their designs in order to evaluate the success of their problem solving and design thinking.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Develop further understanding of potential properties and methods of finishing common materials through a series of creative projects.
2) Develop kinaesthetic skills and practical knowledge that allows successful manipulation of a range of materials.

Term B

1) Demonstrate the ability to follow the technology design process to create a successful outcome.
2) Develop the ability to reflect on personal practice in order to improve future outcomes.

Assessment

Assessment will be by project outcomes. Students will be expected to keep all design work in an A4 folio.

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$70 – covers all materials provided

Prerequisites

None

The aim of this course is to help equip students with the essential skills and knowledge that are involved in fabric technology.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● They will learn basic skills in garment construction and applying decoration, colour and pattern to fabric.
● Three garments and a hand-crafted item are created from a design brief.
● The design process will be employed involving illustration, research, problem solving and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Practice skills in fabric construction and applied decorative techniques.
2) Gain knowledge of garment construction and pattern development.
3) Develop a design process from a brief showing research, presentation of concepts, sketching and modelling.

Term B

1) Demonstrate the application of a range of features to garments.
2) Develop an individual craft product from a brief.

Assessment

Each project is assessed as a module.

Assessment is based on achievement, merit and excellence categories and includes the whole process as well as the finished item.

Students are assessed in the three strands of technology which cover practical capability, management, problem solving, ability to document and work through a design process and research skills.

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$70 – covers all materials provided

Prerequisites

None

Year 10 Art courses are designed with the Key Competencies integral to equipping students with the knowledge, skills and confidence essential to the Visual Arts.

Course Content/ Course Structure

● Programmes have been designed to give students a broad range of art making experiences in two and three dimensional work. This may include combinations of art making approaches such as experimental drawing, pop-art painting, dry-point etching and woodblock printing, black and white photographic processes, basic photo-shop (Adobe CS6) and design techniques, construction and relief sculpture and multimedia formats. This will also function as a thematic taster for Year 11 with a view of the direct pathway to the diverse senior programmes offered in Art Design, Art Painting, Art Photography and Art History.

● Development of ideas will reflect a broad range of subject matter and a variety of motivations which will recognise toi Māor and tikanga Māori, and the multicultural makeup of students and society.

● Students will develop analysis, interpretation, evaluation and literacy skills through examination of visual arts in society.

● Within the semesters programme combinations of the following four Level 6 achievement objectives will be addressed:
– Developing Practical Knowledge in the Visual Arts
– Developing Ideas in the Visual Arts
– Communicating and Interpreting the Visual Arts
– Understanding the Visual Arts in Context

Learning Outcomes for the Course

Term A

1) Demonstrate practical knowledge of Artists characteristics.
2) Identify Artists key characteristics.
3) Present research on Art terminology.

Term B

1) Develop ideas in a variety of media.
2) Demonstrate understanding of specific Artist conventions.
3) Demonstrate practical application of Art terminology.

Assessment

Learning outcomes and evidence is written for each task and linked to Level 5 of the Visual Arts curriculum. These form the basis of the Year 10 assessment schedules. The students are assessed against the criteria of not achieved, achieved, achieved with merit and achieved with excellence categories.

NCEA Standards

In 201 the Art Department will run the NCEA standard AS 90917 v3 (Art 1.5 worth 4 credits) which is a Level 1 Visual Art achievement standard (to be assessed with the other 2016 Level 1 student samples).

Equipment Required

None

Course Fees

$30.00, which will cover all materials and trip

Prerequisites

None

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